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If you're one of the 4,800 8th graders students who didn't get a high school placement last week (or if you didn't like the placement you got) you may want to consider a charter school.

Most charter schools start in the elementary or middle schools gradesand don't accept students in 9th grade—but a few begin with high school and some others have seats for new students in 9th grade. All admit students by lottery. The application deadline is April 1. (Because April 1 is a Saturday, some charters are accepting applications until April 3. Make sure to check their websites.)

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If you’re an 8th-grader who wasn’t matched with a high school, you’re not alone. This year roughly 4,800 (out of nearly 77,000) students did not receive a match and will need to apply to high schools with open seats during Round 2 of admissions. Applications are due March 28.

The Round 2 high school fairs are scheduled for March 18 and 19, 11 am–2 pm at the Martin Luther King Jr. Educational Campus. Try to arrive early so you have plenty of time to meet with representatives from each school you’re interested in and with Department of Education enrollment personnel who can answer your questions.

Eighth-graders who are unhappy with their high school match may reapply during Round 2, but be aware that if you are accepted to another school, you forfeit your Round 1 match.

Current 9th-graders who are offered a 10th-grade seat, in the first or second round, will have the option of remaining at their current school. Ninth-graders who didn't submit an application last December may apply now to schools with open seats.

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For the second year in a row, Francis Lewis High School in Queens, a huge, successful neighborhood high school that offers a plethora of programs for all students, got more applications from 8th-graders than any other school in the city, according to data released by the Department of Education this week. Nearly 10,000 (9,890) students applied to the school in 2016—listing it somewhere on their list of 12—including those lucky students who live in the zone and are guaranteed a seat. 

Midwood High School in Brooklyn, with its highly selective medical science and humanities programs, was second, receiving 9,717 applications. Three large neighborhood high schools in Queens—Forest Hills, Bayside and Benjamin N. Cardozo—were third, fourth and fifth on the list of 20 schools receiving the most applications. That's not surprising in a borough where the most popular high schools are over-crowded and operating with multiple start times.

Edward R. Murrow, a Brooklyn giant that accepts a wide range of students, was close behind with 6,977 applicants. 

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Tuesday, 31 January 2017 12:02

Suit up for summer programs this winter

Winter is the perfect time to think about summer activities for children. In fact, deadlines are coming quickly for many of the city's free programs. Summer is a great time for children to explore a new challenge or continue to sharpen their areas of strength.

Not sure how to find the right program? InsideSchools offers a guide of more than 100 free and low cost, summer and year-round programs for children.

Here are a few samples from across our five subject areas of math, science, arts, humanities, and academic prep to help you navigate your way to a summer of fun for your child.

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Q:  I am a high school junior, and recently failed 4 out of 7 classes I am taking. Last year, as a sophomore, I also failed English. But I got a 1270 on the PSAT, so I'm in the 90th percentile there. I wonder, conceivably, if I turn my act around, will I have a chance to get into a state school with around an 80 percent acceptance rate?

A:  Short answer:  I don't know!

Longer answer:  Your statement raises many questions. There are, as I see it, three major issues:

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Q: I have gotten accepted into two universities that I like: one is a prestigious private university, the other a prestigious state university. Both are highly ranked but the private university has the advantage in rankings. On the flip side, it is much more expensive and I can't gauge which one has a better science program. I'm torn as to which university I should choose. A college visit is off the table so I don't know what my options are to figure out which is better for me.

A: Choosing where to enroll is a very challenging proposition. You are to be congratulated on having such great options. I will ask you one question and then will give you my take.

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Q: I didn’t apply to any school by the November 1, early action deadline. Guess I’ve blown it, right?

A: No. True, many students apply to college under Early Action or Early Decision. But MOST students apply to MOST schools later. On the one hand, you have missed the advantages of Early Action—where you get an early admissions decision without the obligation to enroll—but on the other you have also avoided the frenzy Early Decision where you have to apply and commit to a school early in your senior year.

Take comfort in the fact that if you have not applied to college yet, it’s because you really didn’t want to. Many students who apply under the “early” programs are sorry later. They really needed extra time to make up their minds. If there were indeed a college that you truly, desperately wanted to enter, you would have applied.

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Thursday, 13 October 2016 00:02

HS admissions: Best bets for the "B" student

We all hear about the highly selective schools that only take ace testers and "A" students. But what happens to solid students who don’t make the cut?

The InsideSchools staff compiled a list of our picks for the “B” student. These schools offer solid instruction as well as accelerated, college level and elective classes—many are great picks for the "A" student too. Included are programs in large neighborhood schools, arts and Career and Technical Education (CTE) schools and even a few highly selective ones such as s NEST +M and NYC iSchool.

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by Jared Roebuck

Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration recently announced that a number of charter and district schools will become partners this school year in exchanging ideas and best practices. The subject of school discipline offers fertile territory—what we do when things go wrong. While suspension numbers may go down, it's also likely that school culture and safety will continue to be a challenge and an opportunity to get beyond the reductive charter-vs-district-school conflicts of recent years. Specifically, it's a chance for some district schools to learn from the charter experience about the importance of purposefully executing a vision for school culture. At the same time, it's also an opportunity for certain charters to move beyond their reliance on "no excuses" disciplinary practices (of the kind captured in the memorable viral video of a 1st grade Success Academy teacher) that don't equip students to become considerate, independent adolescents and adults.

The most hopeful outcome would be to expand on the current impetus for "restorative justice" in schools in ways that create "intentionally restorative" school cultures. My experience in both charter and district schools tells me that restorative practices aren't just useful for remedying student misbehavior; they also help students become empathetic, connected, and community-oriented citizens.

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Got an 8th-grader at home? Then you must be gearing up for high school admissions. Our advice: Check out our tips and handy action plan for making the most of your high school search and register for our fall high school admissions workshops!

Insider tips on specialized high schools: September 27, 6 pm

Are you auditioning for LaGuardia? Taking the SHSAT and wondering how to rank the specialized high schools? Got questions about the academics or homework load? Join the InsideSchools staff along with specialized high school students and parents on Sept. 27 for a panel discussion moderated by Clara Hemphill, followed by a Q&A session. RSVP on Eventbrite.

Best Bets for the “B” Student: October 5, 6 pm

Everybody hears about the tip-top schools, the ones that accept only “A” students and ace testers. But what about the average student? What are some good high school options for the "B" student? Join Clara Hemphill and the InsideSchools staff for a panel discussion designed to help you sort out your options. Got other high school admissions questions? We’ll tackle those too. RSVP on Eventbrite.

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