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Ask the college counselor
Thursday, 21 November 2013 12:57

Introducing the HS directory for your pocket

The official high school directory is essential reading for 8th graders applying to high school in New York City. But, at 565 pages, the directory can be cumbersome, especially for kids already lugging pounds of textbooks. 

Now, we've created a mobile site that will get this information to kids where they are most likely to use it--on their smartphones. 

Our new iPhone/Android mobile website, http://insideschools.org/sage, combines all of the information in the official high school directory with our own reviews (based on our school visits) in a platform easily accessible on your smartphone, tablet or computer.

Published in News and views
Monday, 04 November 2013 17:11

Teens at Rikers kept isolated in cells

The New York City Board of Correction released a report last week that documents the stories of three adolescents who were sentenced to more than 200 days in isolation on Rikers Island.

Each of the teens, who were 17 and 18 years old when they were interviewed by the Board, had been diagnosed with a severe mental illness—two with bipolar disorder; one with depression. They had been placed in what's known as 'punitive segregation' for behavioral infractions like fighting or assaulting a corrections officer.

Once in segregation, they spent 23 hours per day alone in their cells, according to the report. Their recreation took place in individual outdoor cages. They weren't allowed to attend school and received no special education services. The majority of their appointments with mental health providers were conducted through cell doors—the adolescent stayed locked inside while the clinician stood in the hallway.

Published in News and views
Monday, 28 October 2013 11:57

With new mayor, could SHSAT be history?

Last weekend, Oct. 26-27, thousands of 8th graders buzzing with the pressure of months (sometimes years) of preparation sat for the two-hour long specialized high school admissions test (SHSAT). Could this be the last year that entrance to a specialized high school hinges on one incredibly high-stakes exam?

If Bill de Blasio is mayor, that's a real possibility.

De Blasio, whose son attends Brooklyn Tech, told the NY Daily News that the high-stakes SHSAT should not be the only factor determining specialized high school admissions. “These schools are the academies for the next generation of leadership in all sectors of the city, and they have to reflect the city better,” de Blasio told the newspaper.

Published in News and views
Friday, 25 October 2013 11:36

Watch our event: Applying to high school

Confused about high school admissions? Do you still have questions about how to fill out the 12-school application? Insideschools covered those topics and more at our Oct. 9 high school admissions workshop.

Clara Hemphill and Jacquie Wayans of Insideschools were joined by Hussham Khan, the director of high school admissions at the Department of Education, Stanley Ng, parent member of the Citywide Council of High Schools; Liz Willen, of the Hechinger Institute and two high school students: Paul Michael Wayans, of Eagle Academy in the Bronx, and David Mascio, a junior at Stuyvesant High School.

Here are some takeaways from the conversation:

  • Don't list a school you don't want to attend; however the more schools you list, the better your chances of acceptance. Choose at least six.
  • You'll get more individual attention at a small school, but there will be fewer high level courses.
  • District 2 priority means that those students get accepted before all other applicants. Most D2 schools fill with district students, says Kahn.
  • Test out the commute to the school before applying, preferably at rush hour.
  • Read the Learning Environment Survey. You can supplement some things, such as sports, but it's harder to change things like a bad principal or an unsafe environment.
  • If you're not happy with the high school assignment, continue to advocate for your child, says Kahn.
  • Stuyvesant students get 3 hours of homework nightly, on average; Eagle students between 1.5-2 hours.
  • Not all schools allow all students access to AP courses. Make sure to ask.

If you missed the event, you can watch it on our YouTube channel.

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 23 October 2013 10:54

Latecomers out of luck with school choice

After enrolling my daughter in middle school earlier this year, I wrote a piece about how difficult it can be to get your child into a good school if you should happen to arrive in the city around the start of the school year. My daughter ended up in a school that was far from our first choice: a "turnaround" school, once slated for closure.

As it turns out, our less-than-optimal enrollment experience is hardly unique in New York City.

A new report from Brown University shows that many of the 36,000 "late-enrolling" high school students are disproportionately being sent to the city's lowest performing schools.

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 09 October 2013 17:54

High School Hustle: Get ready to compromise

When I look back on the full-time job of finding a New York City public high school for my kids, I’m reminded of looking for my first apartment.

Anyone else remember coming to New York City with big dreams and a tiny paycheck? And being shown moldy, tiny apartments, up endless flights of stairs, in neighborhoods no one wanted to visit?

Remember fantasizing about fireplaces, decks and duplexes? Maybe the dreams weren’t even that big. In those early days, I would have happily settled for views of anything other than brick walls, proximity to a subway, and maybe a small washing machine.

Sorry to say that the real estate comparison is valid when you are searching out high schools in Gotham. Your fantasy apartment is out of reach; the perfect high school does not exist.

Published in News and views
Monday, 30 September 2013 12:06

Report looks at why kids aren't college-ready

High school graduation rates are higher than ever before but college completion remains frustratingly elusive for New York City's public high school graduates.

Barely half of students who enroll in CUNY schools graduate with a Bachelor's degree in six years; fewer than one in five of the students who enrolled in city community colleges in 2009 earned a two-year Associate's degree by 2012. Many city high school grads begin college at a disadvantage: not even a third of New York City's class of 2012 earned high enough test scores to avoid remedial courses at CUNY, which has been nicknamed the "13th grade."

A new report from the Center for New York City Affairs (Insideschools' parent organization), Creating College Ready Communities: Preparing NYC's Precarious New Generation of College Students, explores why so many New York City high school grads struggle to earn college degrees. It gives recommendations on how the city's Department of Education and schools could improve college preparation in K-12 enabling students to have a better chance of success. The report follows four years of research by the Center in 14 low-income city schools which were working to improve their college numbers.

Published in News and views
Friday, 27 September 2013 10:54

School lunch price hike begins Monday

(This story first appeared on DNAInfo.com)

Don't forget to put an extra quarter in your child's backpack starting on Monday.

The price of school lunch is rising 25 cents to $1.75 — the first price increase since 2003, when the cost of lunch jumped from $1 to $1.50, according to Department of Education officials.

Monday is also the deadline for parents to register for free lunches — as the city is now allowing all students who formerly qualified for "reduced lunch" to receive free lunch instead, officials said.

Published in News and views
Friday, 27 September 2013 09:59

Insideschools event: Applying to high school

Confused about high school admissions? Have questions you need answered about particular schools, or how to fill out the 12-school application?

Insideschools.org can help! We are offering a free workshop for parents on Oct. 9:  High School Hustle: How to apply.

Leading the discussion will be Clara Hemphill, founding editor of Insideschools and author of New York City's Best Public High Schools. Joining her are other experts on high school admissions, including Jacquie Wayans, Insideschools assignment editor and Bronx parent of three public school students.

We'll present Insidestats, a new way to judge high schools, explain what to look for in a high school, talk about the various types of high schools and provide plenty of time for Q&A.

The event is sponsored by the Center for NYC Affairs at the New School. It will take place at the Theresa Lang Community & Student Center, Arnhold Hall, 2nd floor, 55 West 13th Street, from 6-8 pm on Wednesday, Oct. 9.  It is free, but you must RSVP to EventBrite.

See you there! (Let us know in comments below what questions you'd like to see answered.)

 

 

Published in News and views
Thursday, 26 September 2013 10:29

Tips for acing this weekend's high school fair

This weekend, Sept. 28 and 29, is the Department of Education's gigantic citywide high school fair from 10 am to 3 pm at Brooklyn Technical High School. Prepare for a hectic day, where you will meet teachers, students and administrators and find out about their schools.

You can attend information sessions several times during the day, led by staff from the Education Department's enrollment office. This will be helpful especially if you're a newbie to the process (and it will give you a place to sit down and take a breather.)

Here's the schedule provided by the DOE:

  • High School Admissions at 11 am and 2 pm on both Saturday and Sunday
  • Auditioning for High School Arts Schools and Programs at 12:30 pm on Saturday and Sunday

Most schools will have a table staffed by students, teachers, parent cordinators, guidance counselors and, sometimes the principal. Each borough has a dedicated space between the 2nd and 7th floors. The nine specialized high schools are set up in the first floor gymnasium.

Before you go, make sure to make a list of your "must see" schools. Read the reviews on Insideschools and watch the slideshows and videos. Look at our new "Insidestats" section. It'll give you a thumbnail description on a school's safety and vibe, how well it prepares kids for college, the graduation rate and much more.

Here are some questions you might want to ask school representatives:

  • How much homework is typical? Is homework assigned over school vacations?
  • Are students allowed outside the building for lunch?
  • Does the school offer four years of math and four years of science? (Important for college prep)
  • Are Advanced Placement classes offered? What subjects? What are the requirement to take an AP class?
  • Besides passing required Regents exams, are there are requirements for graduation? Some schools require you to present a portfolio of your work, or perform community service.
  • If the school has a graduating class, which colleges did graduates attend? What percentage of grads went to college? (Check out our Insidestats for that info as well)
  • How does the administration handle discipline? 
  • Are there metal detectors?
  • How does the school help students who are struggling?
  • How does it challenge the strongest students?
  • What are my chances for admission if I don't meet the specific requirements?
  • Is there a uniform?
  • What are the after school activities? What teams do they have? (Note that this can change from year to year and the directory might not be accurate!)

Here are a few more pointers for the day of the fair:

  • Rather than carry around a hefty, heavy directory, consider ripping out the pages of schools that most interest you beforehand.
  • Bring a notebook and pen to write down your impressions and any notes
  • Collect fliers, or write down, the dates and times of school info sessions and tours
  • If there's a sign-in sheet for a school that interests you -- sign in! That gives you a leg-up in admissions for some schools
  • Dress for summer. It gets hot and steamy inside the huge building and there is no place to stash a jacket.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and bring water. You'll be climbing up and down stairs. There will be food and drink for sale, but still, nice to have your own supply.
  • Don't drive! Brooklyn Tech is close to virtually all subway lines and many bus routes. Traffic in the surrounding residential streets can be horrendous, so do yourself a favor and take public transportation.

Insideschools will be at the fair. Stop by our first floor table too.

Before you go, be sure to watch our video: Making the most of the high school fair

If you don't make the big fair this weekend, there will be fairs in every borough on Oct. 19 and 20. Insideschools is hosting our own Applying to High School event on Oct. 9. Watch for details.

Published in News and views