Recent comments

Search News & Views

Ask the college counselor
Friday, 13 December 2013 10:22

HS Hustle: Should teens start school later?

It may be a small step, but a Queens principal became something of a hero in my eyes when he acknowledged a reality of life in high-pressure New York City high schools: Kids are exhausted and need more sleep.

Townsend Harris Principal Anthony Barbetta came up with a new policy that forbids teachers from assigning homework one day of the week or giving tests on designated odd or even days, a New York Daily News story said.

"Maybe it will give [kids] more time to perform community service or participate in extracurriculars — or even get a little more sleep," Barbetta said of the new policy

Townsend Harris is one of the most highly regarded high schools in New York City, and students say the workload is formidable.

Published in News and views

New York City’s Education Funders Research Initiative asked our parent organization, the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School, to identify key priorities for education reform under Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio. On Thursday, the Center for New York City Affairs released the results: a new report called "Building Blocks for Better Schools: How the Next Mayor can Prepare New York's Students for College and Careers," co-authored by Insideschools founder Clara Hemphill. The paper analyzes the successes and failures of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s education initiatives—and proposes six key areas on which the next administration should focus attention and resources.

A top priority: Make sure young children can read. This is a first, crucial building block for school reform efforts.

Other priorities include:

  • Use the Common Core to build a true, skills-based college preparatory curriculum.
  • Revise the accountability system to use a wider range of measures, and to be more responsive to schools and families.
  • Keep principals' control of hiring, budgets and curriculum—but provide them greater supervision and support.
  • Strengthen neighborhood schools and create new structures to connect all schools—neighborhood, magnet and charters alike—within given geographic areas.
  • Build early and ongoing support for college and career guidance.

Read more about "Building Blocks for Better Schools" and download the paper on CenterNYC.org

 

 

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 15:39

Last minute tips on applying to high school

High school applications are due on Dec. 2, the Monday after the Thanksgiving holiday, for 8th graders, and 9th graders who want to go to a different school next year.

Still undecided where to apply? Check out our new Insideschools mobile website on your smartphone. You can search by borough, subway line, middle school grades and/or keyword, sifting through hundreds of high schools to find the best matches.

Here are some tips for 8th graders and their families to mull over afer the turkey is eaten.

Published in News and views
Thursday, 21 November 2013 12:57

Introducing the HS directory for your pocket

The official high school directory is essential reading for 8th graders applying to high school in New York City. But, at 565 pages, the directory can be cumbersome, especially for kids already lugging pounds of textbooks. 

Now, we've created a mobile site that will get this information to kids where they are most likely to use it--on their smartphones. 

Our new iPhone/Android mobile website, http://insideschools.org/sage, combines all of the information in the official high school directory with our own reviews (based on our school visits) in a platform easily accessible on your smartphone, tablet or computer.

Published in News and views
Monday, 04 November 2013 17:11

Teens at Rikers kept isolated in cells

The New York City Board of Correction released a report last week that documents the stories of three adolescents who were sentenced to more than 200 days in isolation on Rikers Island.

Each of the teens, who were 17 and 18 years old when they were interviewed by the Board, had been diagnosed with a severe mental illness—two with bipolar disorder; one with depression. They had been placed in what's known as 'punitive segregation' for behavioral infractions like fighting or assaulting a corrections officer.

Once in segregation, they spent 23 hours per day alone in their cells, according to the report. Their recreation took place in individual outdoor cages. They weren't allowed to attend school and received no special education services. The majority of their appointments with mental health providers were conducted through cell doors—the adolescent stayed locked inside while the clinician stood in the hallway.

Published in News and views
Monday, 28 October 2013 11:57

With new mayor, could SHSAT be history?

Last weekend, Oct. 26-27, thousands of 8th graders buzzing with the pressure of months (sometimes years) of preparation sat for the two-hour long specialized high school admissions test (SHSAT). Could this be the last year that entrance to a specialized high school hinges on one incredibly high-stakes exam?

If Bill de Blasio is mayor, that's a real possibility.

De Blasio, whose son attends Brooklyn Tech, told the NY Daily News that the high-stakes SHSAT should not be the only factor determining specialized high school admissions. “These schools are the academies for the next generation of leadership in all sectors of the city, and they have to reflect the city better,” de Blasio told the newspaper.

Published in News and views
Friday, 25 October 2013 11:36

Watch our event: Applying to high school

Confused about high school admissions? Do you still have questions about how to fill out the 12-school application? Insideschools covered those topics and more at our Oct. 9 high school admissions workshop.

Clara Hemphill and Jacquie Wayans of Insideschools were joined by Hussham Khan, the director of high school admissions at the Department of Education, Stanley Ng, parent member of the Citywide Council of High Schools; Liz Willen, of the Hechinger Institute and two high school students: Paul Michael Wayans, of Eagle Academy in the Bronx, and David Mascio, a junior at Stuyvesant High School.

Here are some takeaways from the conversation:

  • Don't list a school you don't want to attend; however the more schools you list, the better your chances of acceptance. Choose at least six.
  • You'll get more individual attention at a small school, but there will be fewer high level courses.
  • District 2 priority means that those students get accepted before all other applicants. Most D2 schools fill with district students, says Kahn.
  • Test out the commute to the school before applying, preferably at rush hour.
  • Read the Learning Environment Survey. You can supplement some things, such as sports, but it's harder to change things like a bad principal or an unsafe environment.
  • If you're not happy with the high school assignment, continue to advocate for your child, says Kahn.
  • Stuyvesant students get 3 hours of homework nightly, on average; Eagle students between 1.5-2 hours.
  • Not all schools allow all students access to AP courses. Make sure to ask.

If you missed the event, you can watch it on our YouTube channel.

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 23 October 2013 10:54

Latecomers out of luck with school choice

After enrolling my daughter in middle school earlier this year, I wrote a piece about how difficult it can be to get your child into a good school if you should happen to arrive in the city around the start of the school year. My daughter ended up in a school that was far from our first choice: a "turnaround" school, once slated for closure.

As it turns out, our less-than-optimal enrollment experience is hardly unique in New York City.

A new report from Brown University shows that many of the 36,000 "late-enrolling" high school students are disproportionately being sent to the city's lowest performing schools.

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 09 October 2013 17:54

High School Hustle: Get ready to compromise

When I look back on the full-time job of finding a New York City public high school for my kids, I’m reminded of looking for my first apartment.

Anyone else remember coming to New York City with big dreams and a tiny paycheck? And being shown moldy, tiny apartments, up endless flights of stairs, in neighborhoods no one wanted to visit?

Remember fantasizing about fireplaces, decks and duplexes? Maybe the dreams weren’t even that big. In those early days, I would have happily settled for views of anything other than brick walls, proximity to a subway, and maybe a small washing machine.

Sorry to say that the real estate comparison is valid when you are searching out high schools in Gotham. Your fantasy apartment is out of reach; the perfect high school does not exist.

Published in News and views
Monday, 30 September 2013 12:06

Report looks at why kids aren't college-ready

High school graduation rates are higher than ever before but college completion remains frustratingly elusive for New York City's public high school graduates.

Barely half of students who enroll in CUNY schools graduate with a Bachelor's degree in six years; fewer than one in five of the students who enrolled in city community colleges in 2009 earned a two-year Associate's degree by 2012. Many city high school grads begin college at a disadvantage: not even a third of New York City's class of 2012 earned high enough test scores to avoid remedial courses at CUNY, which has been nicknamed the "13th grade."

A new report from the Center for New York City Affairs (Insideschools' parent organization), Creating College Ready Communities: Preparing NYC's Precarious New Generation of College Students, explores why so many New York City high school grads struggle to earn college degrees. It gives recommendations on how the city's Department of Education and schools could improve college preparation in K-12 enabling students to have a better chance of success. The report follows four years of research by the Center in 14 low-income city schools which were working to improve their college numbers.

Published in News and views