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Mexicans are both the fastest growing and youngest major ethnic group in New York City, with nearly half under the age of 25. Yet only 37 percent of the city's Mexican population, ages 16-24, are enrolled in school, according to a new report by Feet in Two Worlds, at the New School's Center for New York City Affairs. Foreign-born Mexican-Americans have a particularly high dropout rate, as do young men. 

A new podcast explores the high dropout rate among Mexican youth and reports on efforts by schools and community groups to reverse the trend. It finds that poverty and a lack of English language proficiency are major contributing factors. In addition, some undocumented students say they are given erroneous information by school guidance counselors.

Listen to the podcast on Fi2W.org

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Thursday, 25 July 2013 11:15

A+NYC presents roadmap for next mayor

The next mayor must ensure fair funding for underserved schools and reduce focus on standardized tests, according to A+ NYC, a coalition of education reform organizations. Yesterday A+ NYC released the PS 2013 Education Roadmap, a proposal for the next mayor's first 100 days in office. 

Rather than view students simply as test-takers, the next mayor needs to look at the "whole child," who needs to be mentally and physically healthy, and develop social skills, they said.

A+ NYC held a highly attended July 24 event at Brooklyn Borough Hall to promote its proposal. Natasha Capers from the Coalition for Educational Justice (CEJ) spoke to hundreds of parents, highlighting the proposal's "whole child" philosophy. "Optimal learning cannot happen without healthy bodies and safe spaces...we know this from research," Capers said.

Capers cited cuts to the arts and after school programs and rising class sizes as damaging to students' education from the "whole child" perspective. She also noted that the number of police personnel in schools is 70 percent higher than the number of guidance counselors, a statistic she believes needs to change.

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Wednesday, 17 July 2013 16:36

HS workshops ease admissons angst

On July 16, the Education Department held the first in a series of summer high school workshops for rising 8th graders and their families. The DOE hosts these workshops every summer to help 8th graders and their families prepare for the complicated high school admissions process.

Hundreds of parents, guardians and students attended the 90-minute session at Prospect Heights Educational Campus; many left saying they felt better prepared for the high school search. The workshop "gives you a starting point to look at the madness and see what you need to be doing," said Khen P. Brady, the parent of an 8th grader.

The DOE's Maurice Frumkin led the presentation, walking students through the phone book-sized high school directory and highlighting a few key recommendations for choosing a high school.

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Tuesday, 16 July 2013 19:04

Ask Judy: Moving in, around & out of NYC

It's summertime and many families are on the move. Whether moving from one borough to another, from the city to the suburbs or to New York City from another state, which school a child will attend is a huge factor in family plans. This week’s inbox was full of questions from families on the move. Here are a few of them.

Can I still go to my charter school?

Q: We are moving to Yonkers in the summer and were wondering if our son can continue attending the Bronx charter school that he has been going to since 1st grade.

A: Yes, your son may continue to attend the city charter school. Here is what the Department of Education Office of Charter Schools told me in an email:

"If a family moves out of the five boroughs, but wants to continue sending their child to a charter school in the city, then the charter school would bill that district the cost of the per-pupil allocation of that school.

Similarly, if a child moves to the city, but chooses to continue attending a charter school outside of the city, then the charter school would bill the district of residence for the allocation for that student"

There is a big BUT:

"If a student moves out of the state, then the family would have to pay tuition and the school would not receive per pupil dollars."

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Wondering what it might cost to get your kids to help make the world a better place? Parents willing to fund volunteer work might find promises like these:

 

“An unforgettable summer! Kayaking! Horseback riding! Service and Surf!”

 

Over the years, there have been plenty of articles about the price of tagging turtles or monitoring zebras – and how little it will help with college admission. I remember reading about one such trip to Fiji a few years back where a student spent more than $3,295 to work – and enjoyed the infinity pool and view of the ocean.

 

None of this was what I had in mind when we first started contemplating New York City public high schools a few years back. At the time, I was particularly impressed by schools like Beacon, where community service is part of the program. In some parts of the U.S., a minimum of 20 hours of service is required for graduation, so the volunteer work is all part of the curriculum. Some city high schools require it, others simply suggest it.

 

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Monday, 15 July 2013 12:56

High school workshops begin this week

Evening workshops about the high school admissions process for 8th graders and their families begin this week. Enrollment officials from the Department of Education wll lead information sessions and answer questions about the types of high school programs offered and how to apply. All sessions run from 6:30-8 p.m. Insideschools will be there too!

The first workshop is Tuesday, July 16 at Prospect Heights High School in Brooklyn; on Wednesday, July 17, there will be a workshop at New Dorp High School on Staten Island and on Thursday, July 18, the Manhattan info session will be held at Fashion Industries High School.

Next week, it's the Bronx and Queens: Lehman High School on Tuesday, July 23 and Forest Hills High School on Wednesday, July 24.

Workshops about the city's nine specialized high schools, which admit students based on an exam or audition, also begin next week. The first session is at Staten Island Tech on Wednesday, July 24, followed by Brooklyn, at Prospect Heights, on Thursday, July 25. The following week, the specialized workshops will be at Fashion Industries onTuesday, July 30; Francis Lewis in Queens on July 31 and the final one at Lehman High School on Thursday, Aug. 1.

Summer specialized high school test sign up & prep

Specialized high school handbooks, including a sample test, will be available at the information sessions. Most students do some prep work or take a course before sitting for the 2 hour and 30 minutes test, which is given in October to 8th and 9th graders.

Some community organizations offer free test prep. One such group is La Casa Azul Bookstore in East Harlem, which is working with a local tutoring company to offer a 20 hour preparatory course, according to the DOE.  For more information, email info.lacasaazul@gmail.com with “Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT)" in the subject line. Include the parent's name, e-mail and phone number, as well as the child’s name, grade and school in fall 2013. Space is limited so check with your local community organizations to find similar courses.

Incoming 9th and 10th graders who moved to New York City after last fall's specialized high school exam may sign up for the August 26 SHSAT exam, and the audition for LaGuardia High School, beginning on July 15 at enrollment offices. The last date to sign up is Aug. 21. See more information here.

Wondering where/how to begin your high school search? Check out our "how to apply to high school" video series. 

Published in News and views
Wednesday, 10 July 2013 11:31

College Counselor: Retake SAT or ACT?

Q: I took the SAT in March and got a 2190 and then took the ACT in June and got a 35. I would be happy with the 35 if I didn’t think that I could score a 36, and I also feel strongly that I could improve on my SAT score. Is it worth it to retake either test? Would it look bad if I retook both? Does a high score on the SAT look better than a high score on the ACT?

A: I’d be happy with a 35, too! Congratulations --your scores are enviable indeed, and I am sure that many readers of this column wish they could do as well on their tests. But yes – I would try for a 36, just because you are so close to it. What do you have to lose?

Your query has several parts to it, and I need to provide several answers – not just for you but for everyone facing standardized tests for college admissions:

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Tuesday, 02 July 2013 12:40

HS directory: Read the fine print!

The Education Department's new directory of the city's 413 high schools, and 705 programs, delivers an official hit to the autonomy of "audition" schools in selecting their future students.

A few months ago, parents and administrators were furious when the DOE assigned both general and special education students who did not audition to selective arts schools. The 2013-14 high school directory clarifies that policy, among others. 

On page 5 of the directory, which went home with rising 8th graders last week, an astericked note next to the admissions methods for audition schools explains that the DOE's Office of Enrollment reserves the right to place students in audition programs if the school has not ranked enough students to fill their seats. That's a change from the admissions policy stated in last year's high school directory on page 8 which said: "You must audition to be eligible for admission."

"The revised screening policy at audition schools had been in place prior to this year, and based on feedback, we wanted to be even more public about it. We always want to build on our record of transparency in our admissions and enrollment policies," said DOE spokesperson Devon Puglia. 

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Tuesday, 02 July 2013 11:40

K-12 charters: No seats for outsiders

If all goes according to plan, about 70 proud teenagers will get diplomas when Success Academy Charter School–Manhattan High School graduates its first class in spring 2018. The moment will likely bring some sadness, though. After all, most of these students will have been together since they entered kindergarten in fall 2007.

Over the years, some students will no doubt have left the group. But, if Success sticks to its announced policies, no new students would have joined the class since 2010, when the graduates were 9 or 10 years old.

Firmly entrenched at the elementary school level, even though they educate only about 6 percent of New York City's public school students, an increasing number of charter operators are seeking to offer a K-12 education for their students.

How they handle this expansion—whether they admit students from other elementary and middle schools—is almost certain to raise new questions and concerns about the role of charter schools and who they serve. Despite those and other questions, the Bloomberg administration is working to put as many charters into play as possible as the clock ticks down to the end of the mayor's term.

Read the rest of this story on City Limits: New Charter High School Will be Closed to Transfer Students

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The Youth Justice Board is looking for teenagers who want to create policy changes to improve the lives of New York City public school students. The Youth Justice Board is open to New York City students age 14-18. In the 2013-2014 year, the Board will study chronic absenteeism and implement policy recommendations to defeat absenteeism in New York City schools. 

The 2012- 2013 Youth Board made ten recommendations to Chancellor Dennis Walcott on how to reduce chronic absenteeism. Suggestions ranged from taking a closer look at school security to providing peer mentors to students who are frequently absent. Read the full list of recommendations here.

“Next year’s [board will] focus on implementing select recommendations from the report. After receiving training in research, public speaking, and leadership skills, members of the Youth Justice Board will work to bring ideas from this report into reality. One possible project might be creating informational materials for young people and their parents that help them connect daily school attendance with positive future outcomes,” said Linda Baird, director of the program.

Students commit to the Justice Board for a 10 months and receive a stipend. Applications are due by Friday, July 12.

Apply hereApplication materials also available online at www.courtinnovation.org/yjb.  For more information about the program, or to request hard-copies of application materials, please contact Linda Baird at (646) 386-5925, or via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." style="line-height: 1.3em;">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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