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Poll: Who's responsible for college prep?

After decades of focusing on Regents exams and graduation rates, in 2011 for the first time the Education Department evaluated each high school on "college readiness" - that is, how many of its graduates were actually prepared to do college work. The score on each school's Progress Report didn't carry any weight this year but the numbers are depressing: fewer than half of the 2011 public high school graduates reported that they planned to enter college in the fall. And only one in four 2011 grads were deemed "college ready" — not in need of remedial college courses after four years of high school. The numbers are even lower for black and Latino students.

The City Council is pressing DOE officials to explain what they are doing to improve college-readiness. In turn, the DOE will hold school's accountable: high schools will be docked points for poor college readiness scores on the 2012 Progress Reports.

High schools already struggle to meet other accountability requirements. Some schools, like It Takes A Village Academy in East Flatbush, have a high Regents pass rate (90% graduate in 4 years) and an abysmal college readiness rate (9%).

Should high schools take more initiative to guide students through test prep, college vists and the application process? Whose responsibility is it to prepare kids for college? Take our poll and share your ideas!

Take our poll

Who's responsible for college prep?

Every high school should offer a mandatory college prep course - 0%
Schools should offer SAT prep during the school day or after school - 0%
The DOE should create citywide after-school programs accessible to all. - 0%
College prep? Schools have enough to do getting kids to graduate. - 0%
It's the family's reponsibility - 0%
Other. Share your ideas. - 0%

Total votes: 0
The voting for this poll has ended on: 19 Feb 2012 - 11:56
Last modified on Thursday, 19 January 2012 13:39

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