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Gifted & Talented: What's new in admissions?

The Anderson School is one of five citywide gifted programs. Students usually must score at the 99th percentile for a chance at admittance. The Anderson School is one of five citywide gifted programs. Students usually must score at the 99th percentile for a chance at admittance. Photo by Skip Card.

Families with four and five-year-olds signing up now for testing for elementary school gifted and talented programs may already know there is going to be a new, harder test for applicants this year. But there are other significant changes as well which affect both new applicants and students already enrolled in G&T programs who may want to make a switch. We spoke to Robin Aronow of School Search NYC who follows the G&T and school admissions scene. Here are some changes she noticed.

  • No guarantees: There is no guarantee of a placement even if you score at the 90th percentile or above. In the past, incoming kindergartners and 1st graders were assured of a spot in a district program providing they scored in the 90th percentile and the family listed all district options on their application. That is no longer the case. High scores will trump low ones and there is a possibility that not all students will get placed.

  • Scoring: Unlike previous years, scores will be issued both in percentiles and in composite scores. There will be many composite scores within a percentile creating greater differentiation. Percentiles will determine eligibility, but composite scores will determine the placement priority. In the past, only percentile scores were considered for both eligibility and priority.

  • Siblings: Sibling priority (meaning an older sibling is enrolled in a particular G&T program at the time the younger one starts) is now
    secondary to the score. In the past all eligible younger siblings got placed first; now only if composite scores are equal, do younger
    siblings get placed before other applicants.

  • Sibling applications: Siblings applying at the same time are considered separately. In the past, if both siblings qualified, the
    higher scoring sibling brought in the lower scoring one. This new procedure applies for twins and other "multiples;"
    now they are considered independently based on each's composite score. If twins have the same score they will be placed together.

  • Transfers: Students already enrolled in a G&T program may apply to transfer from one district G&T program to another, or from one citywide program to another through filing a Placement Exception Request or PER, at an enrollment office. In the past you could not transfer from one district or citywide program to another. Preference will be given to families with a "hardship," such things as a move to a different district, a sibling enrolled at another school, safety or medical issues. There's no guarantee that you'll get a transfer.

  • Openings due to attrition: You can accept an offer at a G&T program and still be considered for a school you ranked higher if it becomes available due to attrition. Last year once you accepted a district program, the process was over for your child.

  • Applying out of district: This year you can apply to programs outside your home district, but priority is given to in-district families. An
    exception is made for people who live in a district that does not offer a G&T program. (There are four of them this year.) In that situation, out-of-district applicants will be given priority in one or more of the programs in a neighboring district.

For more information, check out the handbook online and go to one of five information sessions, beginning Monday, Oct. 22, in Brooklyn. We'll post updates as we get them!

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 17 October 2012 13:53

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