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Insideschools staff

Insideschools staff

Clara Hemphill, Insideschools staff and a panel of experts discussed common mistakes that students and parents make when applying to high school and provide tips on how to make better choices. Watch the live-stream here.

Friday, 17 January 2014 16:12

Figuring out financial aid? New FAFSA guide

Figuring Out Financial Aid? Updated Guide Offers NYC Students Help with the FAFSA and Comparing Financial Aid Packages

The Center for New York City Affairs, home to Insideschools, has published a second edition of its popular guide for high school students who are applying to college and beginning their all-important quest for financial aid: FAFSA: The How-To Guide for High School Students (And the Adults Who Help Them).

We hope this guide will be useful to students, families and the many caring adults in New York City public schools and communities who help families navigate the U.S. Department of Education's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

This year's guide has been updated with the latest information and a new section on what students need to do after they file the FAFSA. It includes an update on FAFSA verification demands and a new section on how to compare college financial aid offers.

Read more on CenterNYC.org.

Download FAFSA: The How-To Guide here. New this year: a Spanish language version of the guide!

Watch Thursday's policy forum on Financial Aid at The New School

FAFSA: The How-To Guide for High School Students was made possible thanks to the generous support of the Capital One Foundation. This guide is part of the foundation's efforts to empower students and provide them with resources to help plan for their academic futures.

Wednesday, 15 January 2014 16:07

Event: Taking the fear out of financial aid

Taking the Fear Out of Financial Aid: Making Higher Education Easier to Achieve for NYC Students

This event, presented by the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School, home of Insideschools.org, is still happening tomorrow (Thursday) morning! Flooding at the university has not affected our event space.

Securing college financial aid can be intimidating for NYC students. Aid is crucial for low-income and first generation college students—but they need help, particularly navigating the government's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), finding grants and loans and working with college aid offices. Experts say the system is needlessly complicated and should be reformed. Join the Center for New York City Affairs for the release of its latest "FAFSA: How-To Guide for High School Students" and a discussion about what needs to happen nationally and locally to ensure that the next generation of college students can afford to matriculate.

Sunday, 22 December 2013 10:08

We mourn the passing of Judy Baum

Judy Baum, who toiled for nearly 40 years to help every New York City child receive a good public education, died Friday, December 20, at the end of another day of doing the work she loved.

In what turned out to be her final blog post for Insideschools, she encouraged students and parents to visit museums, libraries and parks over the holiday break, providing a helpful link to free activities.

Only hours after the post appeared online Friday, she died of a heart attack. She was 77.

"She really was a model New York citizen—always guided by the belief that she had a perpetual stake in the success of public education," said Laura Zingmond, a friend and colleague at Insideschools. "She wanted every kid to have a safe and nurturing place to go to school."

New York City’s Education Funders Research Initiative asked our parent organization, the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School, to identify key priorities for education reform under Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio. On Thursday, the Center for New York City Affairs released the results: a new report called "Building Blocks for Better Schools: How the Next Mayor can Prepare New York's Students for College and Careers," co-authored by Insideschools founder Clara Hemphill. The paper analyzes the successes and failures of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s education initiatives—and proposes six key areas on which the next administration should focus attention and resources.

A top priority: Make sure young children can read. This is a first, crucial building block for school reform efforts.

Other priorities include:

  • Use the Common Core to build a true, skills-based college preparatory curriculum.
  • Revise the accountability system to use a wider range of measures, and to be more responsive to schools and families.
  • Keep principals' control of hiring, budgets and curriculum—but provide them greater supervision and support.
  • Strengthen neighborhood schools and create new structures to connect all schools—neighborhood, magnet and charters alike—within given geographic areas.
  • Build early and ongoing support for college and career guidance.

Read more about "Building Blocks for Better Schools" and download the paper on CenterNYC.org

 

 

Friday, 22 November 2013 11:11

You're invited: Free screening of "Mandela"

Teachers, students and parents are invited to a free screening of "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" hosted by the American Federation of Teachers and The Weinstein Company.

Screenings will take place in Queens, Brooklyn and Manhattan starting at 4pm on Monday, Nov. 25.

Groups, individuals and classrooms are invited to attend!

RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call (646) 254-6718, indicating which screening you'd like to attend. 

The film also has a free educators guide if teachers wish to engage students in activities or discussions around the film.
http://weinsteinco.com/mandela-education/

The film is screening at:

UA Court Street 12
106 Court St.
Brooklyn, NY 11201

UA Kaufman Astoria Cinemas 14
35-30 38th St.
Astoria, NY 11101

AMC Loews Lincoln Square
1998 Broadway
New York, NY 10023

Monday, 30 September 2013 12:06

Report looks at why kids aren't college-ready

High school graduation rates are higher than ever before but college completion remains frustratingly elusive for New York City's public high school graduates.

Barely half of students who enroll in CUNY schools graduate with a Bachelor's degree in six years; fewer than one in five of the students who enrolled in city community colleges in 2009 earned a two-year Associate's degree by 2012. Many city high school grads begin college at a disadvantage: not even a third of New York City's class of 2012 earned high enough test scores to avoid remedial courses at CUNY, which has been nicknamed the "13th grade."

A new report from the Center for New York City Affairs (Insideschools' parent organization), Creating College Ready Communities: Preparing NYC's Precarious New Generation of College Students, explores why so many New York City high school grads struggle to earn college degrees. It gives recommendations on how the city's Department of Education and schools could improve college preparation in K-12 enabling students to have a better chance of success. The report follows four years of research by the Center in 14 low-income city schools which were working to improve their college numbers.

Friday, 27 September 2013 09:59

Insideschools event: Applying to high school

Confused about high school admissions? Have questions you need answered about particular schools, or how to fill out the 12-school application?

Insideschools.org can help! We are offering a free workshop for parents on Oct. 9:  High School Hustle: How to apply.

Leading the discussion will be Clara Hemphill, founding editor of Insideschools and author of New York City's Best Public High Schools. Joining her are other experts on high school admissions, including Jacquie Wayans, Insideschools assignment editor and Bronx parent of three public school students.

We'll present Insidestats, a new way to judge high schools, explain what to look for in a high school, talk about the various types of high schools and provide plenty of time for Q&A.

The event is sponsored by the Center for NYC Affairs at the New School. It will take place at the Theresa Lang Community & Student Center, Arnhold Hall, 2nd floor, 55 West 13th Street, from 6-8 pm on Wednesday, Oct. 9.  It is free, but you must RSVP to EventBrite.

See you there! (Let us know in comments below what questions you'd like to see answered.)

 

 

Mexicans are both the fastest growing and youngest major ethnic group in New York City, with nearly half under the age of 25. Yet only 37 percent of the city's Mexican population, ages 16-24, are enrolled in school, according to a new report by Feet in Two Worlds, at the New School's Center for New York City Affairs. Foreign-born Mexican-Americans have a particularly high dropout rate, as do young men. 

A new podcast explores the high dropout rate among Mexican youth and reports on efforts by schools and community groups to reverse the trend. It finds that poverty and a lack of English language proficiency are major contributing factors. In addition, some undocumented students say they are given erroneous information by school guidance counselors.

Listen to the podcast on Fi2W.org

Wednesday, 10 April 2013 13:08

My kid qualifed for G&T. Now what?

by DNAinfo.com

Many parents exhaled this weekend when they learned their children qualified for the city's sought-after gifted and talented programs.

But many will hold their breath again for the next stressful steps: visiting schools, ranking their choices and submitting applications to the Department of Education by April 19.

Even if a 4-year-old made the grade on the new, harder standardized gifted tests — scoring in the top 10 percent — they are not guaranteed a coveted seat, especially as the number of gifted and talented programs is in flux in local school districts.

[Read more of this article on DNAInfo.com, including a rundown of G&T programs in different neighborhoods and boroughs. DNAInfo reports that at least one Queens school was surprised when parents called to ask about a G&T tour. The school hadn't been informed that they would be housing a program! 

Some parents say that this system is flawed and wonder why there are not enough seats for the kids who score high enough to merit one. How did it work for you?]

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