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Insideschools staff

Insideschools staff

Got an 8th-grader at home? Then you must be gearing up for high school admissions. Our advice: Check out our tips and handy action plan for making the most of your high school search and register for our fall high school admissions workshops!

Insider tips on specialized high schools: September 27, 6 pm

Are you auditioning for LaGuardia? Taking the SHSAT and wondering how to rank the specialized high schools? Got questions about the academics or homework load? Join the InsideSchools staff along with specialized high school students and parents on Sept. 27 for a panel discussion moderated by Clara Hemphill, followed by a Q&A session. RSVP on Eventbrite.

Best Bets for the “B” Student: October 5, 6 pm

Everybody hears about the tip-top schools, the ones that accept only “A” students and ace testers. But what about the average student? What are some good high school options for the "B" student? Join Clara Hemphill and the InsideSchools staff for a panel discussion designed to help you sort out your options. Got other high school admissions questions? We’ll tackle those too. RSVP on Eventbrite.

The first few months of 8th grade can be a hectic time for kids and parents. It’s easy to lose track of all you have to do for high school admissions. Our advice to rising 8th-graders and families: Don’t wait until September to start your high school search.

Summer is a great time to start researching and compiling a list of schools you want to apply to in the fall. Check out our written and video guides on applying to high school. Use Find a NYC Public School to search among the city’s 400+ high schools for ones that may be a good fit for you.

Didn’t make it to one of the Department of Education's high school admissions workshops held in July?  Don’t worry. You can find a recap of the July sessions here, and there will be more opportunities for 8th-graders to learn about high schools in the fall at open houses and at the city- and borough-wide high school fairs.

To help you get started, we compiled some useful information and advice into a handy packet for you to review this summer. Read and print it out here or click on the link below to download. It includes tips on how to get yourself organized, answers to frequently asked questions about the specialized high schools and our action plan, a step-by-step checklist to help you stay on top of everything you need to do between now and the high school application deadline in early December.

By Katie Radvany and Kaia Tien

If you’re a rising freshman, you’re probably already freaking out about your first day of high school. But everyone is just as terrified as you are. You might think everyone is going to be in a competition to rise to the top of the social strata, but being at the top is overrated. High school is only four short years, so you might as well spend it with the people you like.

Do's and don’ts:

We’ve been through this year ourselves, and we have a lot of advice to offer. But the most important thing to remember is do not, under any circumstance, use a rolling backpack. Everyone will be giving you dirty looks in the halls when they trip over it.

by Karra Puccia

During 10 months of the year, hundreds of thousands of New York City kids eat free school breakfasts and lunches. These meals constitute a vital lifeline for families with already-stretched food budgets. So for many such families, the June 28th last day of public school classes may be less about planning summer fun for the kids and more about facing a serious months-long gap in their nutrition.

It doesn't have to be that way. Each year, the federal Summer Food Service Program (which New York City's Department of Education administers under the name "NYC Summer Meals") provides free breakfasts and lunches to all kids 18 and younger—without registration, documents or ID required. From June 29th—the first full day of summer school vacation—right through September 2nd, Summer Meals will be offered weekdays at public schools, Parks Department outdoor pools, New York City Housing Authority complexes, libraries, food pantries, soup kitchens, community organizations and other locations throughout the city. There will also be four mobile food trucks providing meals seven days a week.

Unfortunately, the Summer Meals program can seem like the world's best-kept secret. Food Bank For New York City is in a position to know. We serve nearly 1.4 million people—almost one out of every five New New Yorkers –through a network of food pantries, soup kitchens and community-based charities. And our October 2013 report, "Hunger's New Normal: Redefining Emergency in Post-Recession New York City," which was based on interviews with more than 1,200 people using food pantries and soup kitchens in all five boroughs, found that a whopping two-thirds of families using those resources don't take advantage of Summer Meals. The number one reason? They don't even know about it.

by Nicole Mader, Bruce Cory, and Celeste Royo

The most recent Urban Matters ("Tough Test Ahead: Bringing Diversity to New York's Specialized High Schools") reported on patterns of racial and ethnic admission to some of the city's most prestigious secondary schools and how admissions might more closely mirror the overall composition of the city's public schools. As we showed, only about 16 percent of high-performing Black and Hispanic middle school students gain admission to these elite public high schools.

This week we're following up on comments and questions we received from you.

First, we show all 7th graders in 2012-13 by race, ethnicity and performance level at all 536 public middle schools (including charter schools). At the top of this chart, we see the handful of "feeder" middle schools that send high-performing students of all races to the eight high schools that rely on the specialized high school admissions tests (SHSAT). But we also see hundreds of schools that fail to prepare any students for these specialized schools. Click here to see the chart.

By Bruce Cory, editorial advisor and Nicole Mader, data analyst at the Center for New York City Affairs.

There’s a longstanding debate about why so few Black and Hispanic students are admitted to New York City’s specialized high schools, including Stuyvesant, Bronx Science and Brooklyn Tech. They accounted for fewer than 9 percent of students offered admissions at eight specialized schools for the current school year; that’s down from 9.6 percent the year before. Some say the specialized high school admissions test (SHSAT) is discriminatory and should be scrapped; others say the test merely reflects the poor preparation most Black and Hispanic students, who make up some 68 percent of public school enrollment, get in the elementary and middle schools.

Now, new research by the Center for New York City Affairs shows that even Black and Hispanic students who do very well in middle school—that is, those who as 7th-graders earn the best possible scores on either math or English language arts (ELA) state standardized tests—are much less likely to attend specialized high schools than their similarly high-performing Asian or White classmates.

This suggests that the City’s Department of Education (DOE) may be able to increase Black and Hispanic specialized high school admissions without scrapping the SHSAT (a politically daunting task) or completely overhauling the elementary and middle schools. It offers hope that plans announced last week to increase the diversity of students taking and passing the SHSAT could produce progress.

Got a 7th-grader at home? Relax. High school admissions season doesn't kick in until the fall, so you can spend the next few months preparing for, rather than stressing over, the process. Our advice:

Make sure your 7th grader keeps up with her work and gets to school on time every day. Many high schools look at grades and attendance from this year and there are still three months of school left before summer break.

Come to our high school admissions workshop for 7th grade families!


Join the staff of Insideschools for a presentation on Tuesday, April 19 from 6:30-8 pm at the New School in Manhattan. We’ll tell you what you need to know about high school admissions so that you're ready to hit the ground running in September. Topics covered will include:

The nuts and bolts of applying

Describing your options and how to narrow your list

Applying to screened, audition and specialized high schools

What to do when: spring, summer and fall

Registration is required. Learn more and sign up here.

Applications for pre-kindergarten for all children born in 2012 are due March 9. The city says it will guarantee a seat for all 4-year-olds but it doesn't guarantee where! Many of the most popular zoned schools in Brooklyn have room only for children who live in the zone. We've compiled a district by district list of our best bets for schools and programs that may have seats, based on last year's acceptances.

Remember: It’s always a good idea to visit yourself. When it comes to your child, you’re the expert.

Need more information about districts? Click on our district maps on the homepage.

Watch our video on "What to look for in a pre-kindergarten" and read our tips.

Families can apply to up to 12 programs online at nyc.gov/prek, over the phone at 718-935-2067, or in person at a Family Welcome Center.

Applications for pre-kindergarten for all children born in 2012 are due next Wednesday, March 9 (The Department of Education extended the deadline to apply from March 4.) For those still looking, we can recommend some pre-k programs. [Brooklyn picks are in a separate post.] While some of the most popular programs have many more applicants than seats, these had some space last year and may not be oversubscribed this year. It doesn't hurt to apply, because even if you're not matched in this first application round, your name will be put on a waitlist. Spaces frequently open up, even into the fall.

We've done our best to identify programs we can recommend based on the data available and our school visits. Parents should be sure to visit too: It's a bad sign if a program is unwilling to let you see the classrooms. Watch our video on "What to look for in a pre-kindergarten" and read our tips.

Families can apply to up to 12 programs online at nyc.gov/prek, over the phone at 718-935-2067, or in person at a Family Welcome Center.

THE BRONX

Applying to pre-kindergarten for fall 2016?

If your child turns 4 this year, he or she is eligible for free pre-kindergarten, either in a public school or at a site run by a community organization. But what is the quality of these programs and how can you choose the one that works best for your family?

Join Clara Hemphill and the staff of Insideschools for a pre-k workshop on Feb. 11 at The New School. Register here.

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