Recent comments

Search News & Views

News and views

Can "learning as play" make a kindergarten comeback?

Written by Lydie Raschka Wednesday, 21 September 2016 13:08

One day last school year, a girl in Fanny Roman's kindergarten class at PS 244 in Flushing, Queens arrived bubbling with excitement about her new shoes. With Roman's encouragement, she began tracing classmates' feet on paper and constructing "shoes," using pipe cleaners for laces. Her enthusiasm proved contagious; in response, Roman read poetry and picture books about shoes and students set up a play shoe store of their own, with different-size shoes in boxes, labeled "Jellies" or "Sneakers," as they categorized by size and even priced their wares. In their writing, they started using words such as "Velcro," buckles" and "shoelaces."

Welcome to "choice time." In a number of New York City elementary school kindergarten classes, it revives, in modified fashion, the once-common play-as-learning "free time" that's been driven almost to extinction in favor of whole-class instruction, textbooks, worksheets, and other elements of more rigorous education in the Common Core era.

Biggest adjustment in middle school? Lockers!

Written by Nathaniel Cain Tuesday, 20 September 2016 17:34

Our 6th-grade blogger Nathaniel Cain checks in with a report after his first full week of middle school in Brooklyn.

On Thursday, the first day of school, I was VERY, VERY nervous. I didn't know anyone—except one friend, who was in a different class. It turned out great—all my teachers are amazing. They're super nice and I can tell that they will be teaching me a lot. I can tell this year is going to be great!

It definitely took some small adjustments, though. In elementary school, they have the learning materials. In middle school, especially a large one like mine, they expect you to have everything in your bag, in the moment. Also, going from class to class took some adjusting, too. The 8th-graders tend to dominate the hallways and it's very, very crowded.

Got an 8th-grader at home? Then you must be gearing up for high school admissions. Our advice: Check out our tips and handy action plan for making the most of your high school search and register for our fall high school admissions workshops!

Insider tips on specialized high schools: September 27, 6 pm

Are you auditioning for LaGuardia? Taking the SHSAT and wondering how to rank the specialized high schools? Got questions about the academics or homework load? Join the InsideSchools staff along with specialized high school students and parents on Sept. 27 for a panel discussion moderated by Clara Hemphill, followed by a Q&A session. RSVP on Eventbrite.

Best Bets for the “B” Student: October 5, 6 pm

Everybody hears about the tip-top schools, the ones that accept only “A” students and ace testers. But what about the average student? What are some good high school options for the "B" student? Join Clara Hemphill and the InsideSchools staff for a panel discussion designed to help you sort out your options. Got other high school admissions questions? We’ll tackle those too. RSVP on Eventbrite.

Q: In high school, I was sure I wanted to enter the police force, so I attended a police academy for two years. But then I realized this was not the right career for me, and I left the academy. Now I want to apply to a regular college, but am really worried about this. Will my chances of admission be less because I went to the police academy? I want to get into a top school, but will they consider me good enough for their programs? I am concerned that I might not get in at all, and that my earlier choice might affect my future. What should I do?

A: Don't be so harsh with yourself! A lot of young people make a choice they think is appropriate for them AT THE TIME, but which turns out not to be the right choice. Do you think you're the only one? What about the student who spends a year or two in nursing school, and then realizes her heart isn't in it? Or the one who studies engineering and then discovers it's really math that he wanted?

High School Hustle: Let LaGuardia be LaGuardia

Written by Liz Willen Monday, 22 August 2016 11:22

The call to our home came a few months into my older son's freshman year at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, the performing arts public high now under fire for prioritizing academics over talent.

"This is Dr. Barbara Rowes, and I have something to tell you.''

My heart caught in my throat as I waited to hear from this feared but highly respected English teacher, notorious for setting seemingly impossibly high standards at the school made iconic in the 1980 movie “Fame”.

"Now, I know that your son wants to be a rock star,'' she told me. "But I just finished grading his paper. I think he has a future as a scholar."

I knew he'd been struggling. And now, here was one teacher in this sprawling school of the arts who cared enough about his writing progress to let me know—a measure of how seriously the school takes its dual mission of both college and conservatory arts preparation.

Applying to middle school—a process that begins in the fall of 5th grade—can be stressful if you don’t know what you’re doing. It’s very important that you stay on task.

My name is Nathaniel Cain and I am a soon-to-be 6th-grader at MS 51, the William Alexander School in Brooklyn’s District 15. I comment on Insideschools frequently and you may know me from my profile, “sixthgrader.”

When I was applying to middle school, I had two challenges: 1. There are no zoned middle schools in District 15; and 2. I was living in one of the most competitive school districts in all of New York City. Your struggles may be different.

Here are some tips as you navigate through the middle school process, whether you’re a parent or a rising 5th-grade student:

By Katie Radvany and Kaia Tien

If you’re a rising freshman, you’re probably already freaking out about your first day of high school. But everyone is just as terrified as you are. You might think everyone is going to be in a competition to rise to the top of the social strata, but being at the top is overrated. High school is only four short years, so you might as well spend it with the people you like.

Do's and don’ts:

We’ve been through this year ourselves, and we have a lot of advice to offer. But the most important thing to remember is do not, under any circumstance, use a rolling backpack. Everyone will be giving you dirty looks in the halls when they trip over it.

The first few months of 8th grade can be a hectic time for kids and parents. It’s easy to lose track of all you have to do for high school admissions. Our advice to rising 8th-graders and families: Don’t wait until September to start your high school search.

Summer is a great time to start researching and compiling a list of schools you want to apply to in the fall. Check out our written and video guides on applying to high school. Use Find a NYC Public School to search among the city’s 400+ high schools for ones that may be a good fit for you.

Didn’t make it to one of the Department of Education's high school admissions workshops held in July?  Don’t worry. You can find a recap of the July sessions here, and there will be more opportunities for 8th-graders to learn about high schools in the fall at open houses and at the city- and borough-wide high school fairs.

To help you get started, we compiled some useful information and advice into a handy packet for you to review this summer. Read and print it out here or click on the link below to download. It includes tips on how to get yourself organized, answers to frequently asked questions about the specialized high schools and our action plan, a step-by-step checklist to help you stay on top of everything you need to do between now and the high school application deadline in early December.

by Karra Puccia

During 10 months of the year, hundreds of thousands of New York City kids eat free school breakfasts and lunches. These meals constitute a vital lifeline for families with already-stretched food budgets. So for many such families, the June 28th last day of public school classes may be less about planning summer fun for the kids and more about facing a serious months-long gap in their nutrition.

It doesn't have to be that way. Each year, the federal Summer Food Service Program (which New York City's Department of Education administers under the name "NYC Summer Meals") provides free breakfasts and lunches to all kids 18 and younger—without registration, documents or ID required. From June 29th—the first full day of summer school vacation—right through September 2nd, Summer Meals will be offered weekdays at public schools, Parks Department outdoor pools, New York City Housing Authority complexes, libraries, food pantries, soup kitchens, community organizations and other locations throughout the city. There will also be four mobile food trucks providing meals seven days a week.

Unfortunately, the Summer Meals program can seem like the world's best-kept secret. Food Bank For New York City is in a position to know. We serve nearly 1.4 million people—almost one out of every five New New Yorkers –through a network of food pantries, soup kitchens and community-based charities. And our October 2013 report, "Hunger's New Normal: Redefining Emergency in Post-Recession New York City," which was based on interviews with more than 1,200 people using food pantries and soup kitchens in all five boroughs, found that a whopping two-thirds of families using those resources don't take advantage of Summer Meals. The number one reason? They don't even know about it.

Originally posted on Chalkbeat by Monica Disare on June 27, 2016

When people think of Coney Island, they often picture a beachline with brightly colored roller coasters and hot dog stands, but high school teacher Lane Rosen sees it a laboratory for the next generation of marine scientists.

"People don't realize there's 567 miles of coastline in New York City," Rosen said. "There's tens of thousands of jobs, but we're not training anybody for any of them."

Rosen and a group of teachers in Coney Island have a radical plan to transform education in their neighborhood: build a marine science pipeline that helps guide a student all the way from the first day of elementary school through college or into a career.