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Success gets $5 million to open 100 schools

Written by DNAinfo Tuesday, 27 August 2013 10:39

(This story first appeared on DNAInfo.com)

The controversial charter network Success Academy plans to operate 100 New York schools by the end of the next decade, DNAinfo New York has learned.

The charter chain already has 20 schools in the city with another seven slated to open next year, despite fierce opposition from public school advocates in Williamsburg, Hell's Kitchen, Gramercy, Harlem and other neighborhoods.

It received a $5 million grant Monday from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation to continue its rapid New York expansion, with "as many schools as possible" opening in the next several years, a member of the foundation said.

"They're trying to grow up to 100 schools in the next decade," said Rebecca Wolf DiBiase, the foundation's managing director of programs who has worked closely with Success Academy since their inception.

Apply for (a few) 4th, 5th grade G&T seats

Written by Pamela Wheaton Monday, 26 August 2013 13:00

Fourth and 5th-graders who scored 4's (the highest level) on both the 2013 state reading and math exams may apply now through Sept. 16 for seats in district and citywide gifted and talented programs for this school year, 2013-2014. Unlike the younger elementary grades which base admission to G&T programs on asssessments including the OLSAT, admittance in the upper elementary grades depends solely on state standardized test scores. Like the younger grades, demand far outweighs supply!

Seats are scarce, especially for 5th grade, and some districts have more openings than others. There may be a very few seats at citywide gifted programs, which require a higher score, as well as the district programs.

To find out whether your child is eligible, check his test score now available on the ARIS parent link. For parents without internet or computer access, the DOE has set up stations at local libraries this weekwhere parents can see their children's scores.

New student enrollment centers open Aug. 28

Written by Pamela Wheaton Friday, 23 August 2013 11:05

Students who are new to New York City public schools or who are re-entering city schools after a time away, may register at special enrollment centers beginning on Aug. 28 in all boroughs. The centers are open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sept. 18, with the exception of Sept. 2, Labor Day and Sept. 5 and 6, Rosh Hashanah. Regular Department of Education enrollment offices will be closed during that time.

All high school students should go to the enrollment centers, along with any elementary and middle school students who do not have a zoned school.  Elementary and middle school students who have a zoned school should wait until the first day of school, Sept. 9, to register at the school, the Education Department said.

All special education students who have a current IEP (Individualized Education Plan) may enroll directly at their zoned schools on Sept. 9. Students without a current New York City IEP need to go to an enrollment center or to a special education site.

Our advice: do your research before you get to the enrollment center. Make up a list of schools that would be a good fit for your child. Read our school profiles on Insideschools and check out other reports about each school on the DOE's website. If you have doubts about your zoned school, know that there are other schools in every district that are alternatives. You can use our "advanced search" option to find "unzoned" schools, or look at the DOE's elementary and middle school directories online.

HS Hustle: Time for parents to back off?

Written by Liz Willen Wednesday, 21 August 2013 12:20

The first week of middle school a few years back, I learned that two cherished rituals were soon to be stripped from our lives: bringing cupcakes to our children's class for birthdays and traveling to school together with them.

"Your kids are going to be taking the subway alone to school soon, deal with it,'' the principal told an auditorium full of parents on day one, as some cowered in fear and uncertainty.  

Soon enough, parents got used to the subway ritual, after following close behind for a few days – just never close enough to be seen. The principal just laughed at the parent (me) who asked about bringing cupcakes, and it never came up again.

By the time your child starts high school, you are deep into what I call "The Age of Embarrassment"  and long past cupcakes and drop-off worries. Still, you may be filled with uncertainty about what your role should be during these four critical years. 

HS junior gives 9th graders some advice

Written by David Mascio Wednesday, 21 August 2013 12:16

Brooklyn teen David Mascio is entering his junior year at Stuyvesant High School. Here's his advice to students just getting ready to start their freshman year at a new high school.

Starting high school can be stressful. You may have left many of your middle school friends behind as you go to a different and unfamiliar neighborhood and you only have a vague idea of what the school will require from you. Fortunately, there are ways to eliminate much of that stress and make your freshman year an enjoyable and successful one.

Before classes begin, take a trip to the school and get to know the neighborhood. It's a good opportunity to familiarize yourself with the commute and figure out how long it will take you to get to school. And, if your school allows you to go out for lunch, you can find interesting places to eat.

5,000 free backpacks for kids in need

Written by Anna Schneider Tuesday, 20 August 2013 14:51

Islamic Circle North America's annual backpack giveaway to New York City school children began in late July and lasts through September. The group will give away a total of 5,000 backpacks stuffed with back-to-school supplies to children in need of any religious faith. 

There are three giveaway events this weekend:

Saturday, 8/24, from 3 - 5 PM at the Douglass Housing Projects, 102 Street and Amsterdam Avenue in Manhattan

Sunday, 8/25, from 12 - 2 PM at ICNA Al-Markaz Masjid, 166-26 89th Avenue, in Jamaica, Queens

Sunday, 8/25, from 12- 2 PM at Albanian Islamic Cultural Center, 307 Victory Boulevard in Staten Island

Next weekend: 

Friday, 8/30, from 5:30 - 7 PM at the MAS Community Center, 25-15 Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens

Saturday, 8/31, from 1 - 3 pm at Masjid Taqwa at 1266 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn

Sunday, 9/1, from 12- 2 PM at the ICNA Brooklyn Community Center 865 Coney Island Avenue in Brooklyn

Sunday, 9/1, from 2 - 4 PM at the Masjid Al-Ansar, 161-34 Foch Boulevard in Rochdale, Queens

The backpacks are free to any child in need. See ICNA.org for more information. 

College Counselor: Squelching testing rumors

Written by Dr. Jane S. Gabin Tuesday, 20 August 2013 11:49

I’ve heard that . . .

When I hear that phrase, I know what follows: a rumor. Sometimes the rumors are new, sometimes they have been around the block before, but they usually have one thing in common – they are not true.

While the rumor mill becomes a little quieter over the summer, when it’s back-to-school time it grinds louder. And for some reason, there are so many rumors about the college process! Here are some of the “I’ve heard” stories concerning standardized testing, namely about the SAT and ACT.

I’ve heard that the ACT is easier than the SAT.

No, they are both challenging tests. They are different tests, but they assess the same skills.

How to get your child's test scores

Written by Pamela Wheaton Monday, 19 August 2013 14:42

Beginning on Monday, Aug. 26, parents of children in grades 3 to 8 who took standardized state reading and math exams this year can find their child's test scores on ARIS, the Department of Education's online system for parents.

You'll need to know your student's id number and a password to log in. If you don't have that information, or you don't have access to a computer, the DOE will have staff available at a library in each borough to help you.

Here's the schedule (from the DOE's website):

Screen shot 2013-08-19 at 4.41.43 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you need help but can't make it to one of the libraries, you may go to the DOE's office of family engagement at 49 Chambers Street, Room 503, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Your school's parent coordinator may also help you.

Kindergarten countdown: Best books to read!

Written by Aimee Sabo Friday, 16 August 2013 11:11

The other night my son chose one of my all-time favorite children’s books to read, “I Am Too Absolutely Small for School” by Lauren Child. The story follows a quirky little girl named Lola who, when informed by her brother Charlie that she will be starting school in the fall, comes up with many creative reasons why she needn’t go (among them that she does not need to learn to count to 100 because “I never eat more than ten cookies at one time”). Luckily, Charlie's counterarguments win over Lola in the end, and she finds that school is much more fun than she expected.

We’ve been reading the book quite a lot lately, and since both my boys are starting new schools this fall (Doodle heads to preschool, and Noodle to kindergarten) it’s no big surprise. Reading along as Lola successfully overcomes her fears is just one way for my kids to work through their own emotions about this big transition.

On my quest to find more good books about starting school, I had the pleasure of speaking to librarian Betsy Bird, Youth Materials Specialist for BookOps, the shared technical services organization of New York Public Library and Brooklyn Public Library. Here are some of her top choices. Check out your local library to see if you can find them on the shelves.

Ask Judy: How will scores affect admissions?

Written by Judy Baum Thursday, 15 August 2013 14:23

Dear Judy,

I just read the news on your site about lower NYC ELA and Math standardized test scores. My son is a soon-to-be 8th grader and this news is devastating. I haven't yet seen his score but I know that many screened/selective high school programs require a minimum of 3 on state standardized tests. Will admissions policies change in these schools in recognition that kids were tested on new standards they never learned? What advice do you have in navigating the high school admissions process for those who will begin the process this fall?

Concerned Parent in Brooklyn

Dear Concerned Parent in Brooklyn,

As you know, as of this week parents can access their child's test scores on ARIS. In fact, DOE officials are at city libraries to help parents access the scores and to explain them. If you have questions about your child's test and want to review it, you can ask the principal to set up an appointment for this purpose. You have to fill out a request and a professional will show it to you. This year, only some of the exam questions and answers will be shown. For general information, some of the questions are available online.

Many parents have complained that the percentile range shown on ARIS is too wide to be of use to determine if their kids are eligible for some of the highly selective schools. So far there is no word as to when more specific percentile information will be available. 

As of yet,there has been only a little discussion of how the schools will handle these very low scores. We do know that in the spring, just after kids took the state tests, a group of principals distanced themselves, vowing to ignore results of what they saw as faulty and unfair tests.