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10,000 more pre-k seats. Sign up now!

Written by Laura Zingmond Friday, 30 May 2014 16:39

Parents looking for a pre-kindergarten program for their four-year-olds now have a lot more options. The city is opening 10,400 new pre-k seats this September in community-based organizations, including childcare centers, libraries, public housing projects and Catholic and Jewish schools. This is in addition to the 15,000 pre-k seats currently offered at community organizations.

New pre-k seats will open in roughly 280 community organizations across all five boroughs. More than 4,500 of the new spots will be in Queens. Bronx and Brooklyn will each gain roughly 2,100 new seats. Staten Island is gaining about 990 seats; Manhattan only 580.

G&T: Sixty percent of applicants get offers

Written by Laura Zingmond Wednesday, 28 May 2014 13:47

Sixty percent of students who applied to gifted and talented (G&T) programs in 2014 received offers. That’s an improvement from 2013 when 54 percent of applicants received offers after enduring a rocky admissions process marred by scoring errors and a subsequent lawsuit filed by parents. Overall, G&T offers still fall short of 2012 when 73 percent of all applicants received good news.

More students sat for the G&T this year than in either of the previous two years, but fewer scored high enough to be eligible for a G&T spot. This year the Department of Education (DOE) changed the G&T scoring process by giving equal weight to the test's two components: the Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT2). In 2013, the NNAT2 comprised 66 percent and the OLSAT 33 percent of the total score.

As in previous years, admission to one of the five citywide G&T programs eluded most eligible students. While over 3,400 G&T test takers scored high enough—97th percentile or better—to qualify for a citywide G&T seat in grades k to 3, only a few hundred spots are available, and almost all of them go to those who score in the 99th percentile, or to eligible siblings of current citywide G&T students. The DOE has not released figures for how many were offered a citywide G&T seat this year, but last year roughly 300 earned a spot. After 3rd grade, placement in G&T programs is based on standardized state test scores.

Q: I am a junior and starting to think about where to apply to college next year. I am a pretty good student, so I think I will have a lot of possibilities. But I am really worried about money. I've read so many articles about student debt. My parents can't afford to pay $60,000 a year for college, and I don't want to be stuck with loan payments for 30 years! But everyone says graduating from a top college will help me get into a better grad school or get me a better job.

A: Your first step is to stop believing what "everyone" says! "They" don't know the details regarding every situation. Do you think that job placement and spots in graduate schools are given ONLY to Ivy League alumni and others who attended super-selective private colleges? Of course not. While it is true that some students might feel lost at first attending a very large institution, the chief reason for the aversion to state schools is snobbery.

It appears that many New York City public school principals have a great deal to say about this spring's standardized English tests for grades 3–8.

Only they can't, because they are under a gag order.

I wish we could at least informally do the same for students—and parents.

No matter how you feel about standardized testing, I am convinced that it is both bad form and harmful to talk about test scores.

Full-day pre-k not full enough for some parents

Written by DNAinfo Monday, 05 May 2014 14:49

(This story first appeared on DNAInfo.com.)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has promoted his pre-K expansion as a way to help working families — but programs that last only about six hours a day aren't long enough for many New Yorkers, parents and advocates said.

Although the thousands of new public school pre-K seats being created this year are called "full-day," they run on a typical school day schedule, from about 8 a.m. to 2:20 p.m., with summers and vacations off.

That's why many low-income families have been turning to the 350 community-based organizations that provide pre-K classes that last 10 hours per day and run year-round. As part of city's Early Learn program, these organizations offer low-cost pre-K seats using federal, state and city funding.

However, the thousands of new pre-K seats de Blasio plans to create over the next two years at community-based organizations will only have enough funding to cover the school day schedule of about six hours a day, 10 months per year, officials said — raising concerns that they will not adequately serve some of the families de Blasio had pledged to help.

Waitlisted for kindergarten? Here's what to do

Written by DNAinfo Monday, 28 April 2014 16:18

(This story first appeared on DNAInfo.com. Insideschools added a few clarifications based on our reporting.)

Astoria resident Janet Piechota filled out kindergarten applications earlier this year, she hoped to win a spot for her daughter at P.S. 85, which has strong music programs and other enrichment classes.

She was frustrated last week to discover that not only had her daughter Daniela not gotten into P.S. 85 — she hadn't gotten into any of the top four schools Piechota had selected, after she researched everything from the schools' dual-language classes to reviews of their parent coordinators.

Daniela was admitted to her zoned school, P.S. 234, which is well-regarded but was her mother's last choice because it appeared to her to lack some of the enrichment activities available at other nearby programs.

"I was disappointed," said Piechota. "It was a time-consuming process, to go through all these schools in advance."

Poetry is bite-sized, why aren't books?

Written by Lydie Raschka Monday, 28 April 2014 12:18

(This article by Lydie Raschka, Insideschools writer and school reviewer, appears in the April 22, 2014 online edition of Education Week.)

Recently I spent 10 weeks as a classroom teacher again, after a long hiatus. One night, I stayed late at school to prepare the shelves for our cross-genre reading unit. My six-year-olds were going to hunt through baskets of books to find fiction, nonfiction, and poetry related to a topic of interest to them. I ransacked the shelves and filled the baskets with books about math for a boy in my class named Evan, about U.S. presidents for Deana, and old-fashioned automobiles for Eliana.

Over the course of the week each child would pick a topic and read for information about it from different genres, so I'd spend prep time making it easier for them to get the books they needed. But when it came to poetry, I hunted around and was pulled up short. All the poetry books were unwieldy and hard to categorize by topic. They were also oddly shaped: I had to place them between our book baskets because they were too big, too fat, and too wide to go inside. One of the metal bookends I was using bent and the books clattered to the floor like the dominoes the children set up in snaking rows around a table at indoor recess.

Take a perennial favorite, Shel Silverstein's Where the Sidewalk Ends. Because poetry lends itself to being read aloud, most teachers of young children (myself included) keep a copy of this beloved book on a shelf by the daily schedule, cover faced out, or tucked into a larger basket of read-aloud books on the rug where the class gathers for morning meeting.

Unfortunately, at 176 pages, Where the Sidewalk Ends is a heavy book, so for the most part it remains in the hands—and the power—of the adult. I'm not saying the kids in my class couldn't or didn't browse through it on their own but they were generally less inclined to pick up this book and other classroom poetry books because they were big and occupied a separate space.

Read the rest of the article at Education Week.

Time to decide! Choosing between 2 colleges

Written by Dr. Jane S. Gabin Thursday, 24 April 2014 12:24

Ask the College Counselor!

Q: I can't decide where I should enroll in college. I was accepted by four schools, have decided against two of them, but now I can't decide between the other two. They are both great schools. I have visited them, but don't have enough time to go back for a second visit. Can I send enrollment deposits to both places and then make my final decision later?

A: No – May 1 is the universal enrollment deadline in the US. It is against the professional ethics set out by the National Association of College Admissions Counselors (NACAC) for students to enroll at more than one college or university. High schools are bound by these rules, too, so they are not allowed to send more than one final transcript for a student. Without this final transcript in hand, a college will not officially enroll a student. So even if you attempt to double-deposit, you will not be able to double-enroll.

Long kindergarten waitlists persist at 5 schools

Written by Pamela Wheaton Wednesday, 23 April 2014 16:00

Five elementary schools have waitlists of more than 50 zoned children after the first round of kindergarten admissions and a few schools have more than doubled their waitlists from this time last year, according to a list issued by the Department of Education today. Although the number of schools that cannot accommodate all their zoned students has shrunk nearly in half since 2012 -- from 125 in 2012 to 63 this year -- overcrowding persists in some neighborhoods.

Once again, Pioneer Academy, PS 307 in Corona, Queens has the longest waitlist in the city, with 126 waitlisted zoned five-year-olds, as compared to 167 last year and 109 in 2012. PS 307, where nearly one-third of the students are new immigrants, was opened in 2008 to alleviate overcrowding in District 24.

On Manhattan's Upper West Side PS 199 has about 100 zoned students on its waitlist, up from 39 last year. PS/IS 276, one of a bevy of new downtown Manhattan schools opened over the past 10 years, has a waitlist of 52 students.

In the Bronx, gigantic PS/IS 71 has 50 kindergartners waitlisted; high-performing PS 7 in Marble Hill has 59 students on the waitlist.

Kindergarten Connect: 71% get 1st choice

Written by Pamela Wheaton Monday, 21 April 2014 12:16

Some 71 percent of the families who applied to kindergarten this year via a new online application system were assigned to the school they ranked first on their application, the city announced today. Another 12 percent got either their second or third choice, the Department of Education said.

Nearly 11 percent -- 7,238 students -- did not get any of their choices and were assigned to schools they didn't apply to; in some cases their zoned school; in others another school in their district. Last year students who weren't accepted at any schools they applied to weren't given an alternate placement until June.

The DOE inaugurated its new "Kindergarten Connect" system in January and, for the first time, families applied to kindergarten online, on the phone or at a DOE enrollment office, rather than submitting separate applications to each school. Instead of being potentially matched to more than one school, this year applicants were given one match. Letters were sent home today to the 67,000 families who applied by the Feb. 20 deadline. Families who have not yet applied, or who have moved since they submitted their application, now may visit the schools in person to apply. All children who turn five years old in 2014 are guaranteed a spot in kindergarten.

63 schools have waitlists for zoned students

The new application allowed families to apply to 20 schools or programs. The DOE said the "streamlined application" helped reduced waitlists at crowded zoned neighborhood schools. Waitlists — a perennial problem at very popular and over-crowded schools — were decreased, by nearly half since 2012, according to DOE data. A still significant number of 63 schools have waitlists for zoned students, down from 125 schools two years ago and 105 schools last year.