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Ask Judy: May I take my child to India for two months?

Written by Judy Baum Tuesday, 10 September 2013 16:36

 Dear Judy,

I will be leaving on sabbatical to India next year, Sept and Oct. 2015. My child will be going into 6th grade. I am wondering if I can take her out for these two months and get an educational plan from the DOE, so upon our return, my child will have an easy transition back into her school?

Sabbatical mom

High School Hustle: What are we fighting for?

Written by Liz Willen Monday, 09 September 2013 11:38

No matter how you feel about the end of summer (I am always sad and counting the days until the next one), this week marks the start of what may be a four-year fight for parents of high school freshmen.

A fight to make sure they get the right classes, the right teachers and even a lunch period. A fight to make sure they get support for what could be a tough adjustment from middle school.

A fight to make sure they are ready for college; too many U.S. students are not.

For New York City public school parents, it's likely an ongoing battle -- even at some of the city's best and most sought-after high schools.

Big name schools getting new principals

Written by Pauline Zaldonis Friday, 06 September 2013 10:55

A few of the city’s best-known schools have new principals this year. 

This week, an email announced to parents at Bronx High School of Science that Jean Donahue, assistant principal for biology and physical sciences, isl taking over as the school’s interim acting principal. An alumna of the school, parent of a recent graduate, and former teacher at Bronx Science, Donahue knows the school well. She has a PhD and did cancer reasearch before she came to Bronx Science, where she lead the 3-year-research program. According to the Alumni Association’s facebook page, she has strong relationships with many faculty and with the Alumni Association. She will be taking over after former principal Valerie Reidy retired this summer after over a decade as the principal of Bronx Science. She stepped down amidst a high-profile investigation about incidents of hazing on the boy’s track team and after years of tension between teachers and administrators.

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts also has a new principal this fall. This summer long-time principal Kim Bruno announced that she was leaving LaGuardia for a job as the principal of the Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts in Los Angeles, California. Lisa Mars, former Assistant Principal of Language, Art and Music at Townsend Harris High School will take over as interim acting principal in her place. Parents at LaGuardia told Insideschools that they are hopeful that Mars will be a good leader for the school. However, according to members of the school’s Drama Parent Association, the transition is off to a difficult start since Mars still has not appointed a new assistant principal for the school’s Drama and Tech Studios, making them the only arts studios in the school without an AP.

At Brooklyn Latin founding principal Jason Griffiths announced this summer that he is leaving the school to lead Harlem Village Academy Charter School. Gina Mautschke, who has been with the school since its founding in 2006, is taking over as principal this fall. Mautschke began by teaching math at Brooklyn Latin until she was promoted to Assistant Head of Master of Operations in 2011, according to The Greenpoint Gazette. While Griffiths got high marks from teachers at Brooklyn Latin, according to the school’s Learning Environment Survey, he chose to leave after seven years, reportedly because of his frustration with dealing the city bureaucracy.

High schools aren’t the only ones with new principals this fall. Some of the city’s noteworthy elementary schools are also undergoing leadership changes this fall. This fall, former principal of PS 212 Midtown West, Dean Ketchum, will be starting as the new principal at Hunter College Elementary School.  According to the Hunter College website, Ketchum served as principal of Midtown West for nine years, where he got excellent reviews from teachers. Still no word on who is taking Ketchum’s place at Midtown West.

 

Important dates for middle school applications

Written by Aimee Sabo Wednesday, 04 September 2013 11:05

School may not have started yet, but incoming 5th-graders and their parents may want to begin thinking ahead. The Department of Education offered this calendar of important dates for those applying to middle school for the 2014-2015 school year: 

October 2013

 Directories distributed to families

October – December 2013

 Open houses at middle schools

October 8 – 17, 2013

5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

 District middle school fairs. Click here for a full list

November 2013

 Middle school applications distributed to families

December 2013

 Deadline for families to return middle school applications in all districts

December 2013 – February 2014

 Student interviews and testing at selected middle schools

February 2014

 New middle schools application packets distributed to families

March 2014 

 New middle school application deadline

May 2014

 Decision letters distributed to families

June 2014

 Appeal decision letters distributed to families 

 

To begin your research, read more about the middle school application process, or check out these Inside schools videos:

"How to Apply to Middle School"

"What to Look for on a School Tour"

 

Cheap WiFi for low income kids

Written by Anna Schneider Wednesday, 28 August 2013 16:43

A new program rolling out in New York City aims to bridge the "digital divide" and get low income students connected to the internet at home. About one in four, or 2.2 million New Yorkers, are without internet access at home and most of those New Yorkers are low-income and minority, according to EveryoneON, the organization running the Connect2Compete program that gives access to discounted internet service and low price computers. 

Mayor Bloomberg held a press conference in front of a class of 7th-graders on the Upper West Side's MS 258 on Wednesday to promote the Connect2Compete program, which is already underway in other major cities like Chicago. He was joined by Carlos Slim Domit, son of Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim Helú, former NBA Knicks star John Starks, Education Department Chancellor Dennis Walcott and the principal of MS 258, John Curry. 

"What we are doing today is getting together to try to provide the same opportunities to you and to other students," Domit said. He explained that more than 60 million Americans are not connected to the internet (as opposed to 35 million who are not connected in his home country, Mexico) and many of those 60 million are people of color. Domit's family foundation is a partner of Connect2Compete and working to decrease those numbers in Mexico and the US. 

Success gets $5 million to open 100 schools

Written by DNAinfo Tuesday, 27 August 2013 10:39

(This story first appeared on DNAInfo.com)

The controversial charter network Success Academy plans to operate 100 New York schools by the end of the next decade, DNAinfo New York has learned.

The charter chain already has 20 schools in the city with another seven slated to open next year, despite fierce opposition from public school advocates in Williamsburg, Hell's Kitchen, Gramercy, Harlem and other neighborhoods.

It received a $5 million grant Monday from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation to continue its rapid New York expansion, with "as many schools as possible" opening in the next several years, a member of the foundation said.

"They're trying to grow up to 100 schools in the next decade," said Rebecca Wolf DiBiase, the foundation's managing director of programs who has worked closely with Success Academy since their inception.

Apply for (a few) 4th, 5th grade G&T seats

Written by Pamela Wheaton Monday, 26 August 2013 13:00

Fourth and 5th-graders who scored 4's (the highest level) on both the 2013 state reading and math exams may apply now through Sept. 16 for seats in district and citywide gifted and talented programs for this school year, 2013-2014. Unlike the younger elementary grades which base admission to G&T programs on asssessments including the OLSAT, admittance in the upper elementary grades depends solely on state standardized test scores. Like the younger grades, demand far outweighs supply!

Seats are scarce, especially for 5th grade, and some districts have more openings than others. There may be a very few seats at citywide gifted programs, which require a higher score, as well as the district programs.

To find out whether your child is eligible, check his test score now available on the ARIS parent link. For parents without internet or computer access, the DOE has set up stations at local libraries this weekwhere parents can see their children's scores.

New student enrollment centers open Aug. 28

Written by Pamela Wheaton Friday, 23 August 2013 11:05

Students who are new to New York City public schools or who are re-entering city schools after a time away, may register at special enrollment centers beginning on Aug. 28 in all boroughs. The centers are open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sept. 18, with the exception of Sept. 2, Labor Day and Sept. 5 and 6, Rosh Hashanah. Regular Department of Education enrollment offices will be closed during that time.

All high school students should go to the enrollment centers, along with any elementary and middle school students who do not have a zoned school.  Elementary and middle school students who have a zoned school should wait until the first day of school, Sept. 9, to register at the school, the Education Department said.

All special education students who have a current IEP (Individualized Education Plan) may enroll directly at their zoned schools on Sept. 9. Students without a current New York City IEP need to go to an enrollment center or to a special education site.

Our advice: do your research before you get to the enrollment center. Make up a list of schools that would be a good fit for your child. Read our school profiles on Insideschools and check out other reports about each school on the DOE's website. If you have doubts about your zoned school, know that there are other schools in every district that are alternatives. You can use our "advanced search" option to find "unzoned" schools, or look at the DOE's elementary and middle school directories online.

HS Hustle: Time for parents to back off?

Written by Liz Willen Wednesday, 21 August 2013 12:20

The first week of middle school a few years back, I learned that two cherished rituals were soon to be stripped from our lives: bringing cupcakes to our children's class for birthdays and traveling to school together with them.

"Your kids are going to be taking the subway alone to school soon, deal with it,'' the principal told an auditorium full of parents on day one, as some cowered in fear and uncertainty.  

Soon enough, parents got used to the subway ritual, after following close behind for a few days – just never close enough to be seen. The principal just laughed at the parent (me) who asked about bringing cupcakes, and it never came up again.

By the time your child starts high school, you are deep into what I call "The Age of Embarrassment"  and long past cupcakes and drop-off worries. Still, you may be filled with uncertainty about what your role should be during these four critical years. 

HS junior gives 9th graders some advice

Written by David Mascio Wednesday, 21 August 2013 12:16

Brooklyn teen David Mascio is entering his junior year at Stuyvesant High School. Here's his advice to students just getting ready to start their freshman year at a new high school.

Starting high school can be stressful. You may have left many of your middle school friends behind as you go to a different and unfamiliar neighborhood and you only have a vague idea of what the school will require from you. Fortunately, there are ways to eliminate much of that stress and make your freshman year an enjoyable and successful one.

Before classes begin, take a trip to the school and get to know the neighborhood. It's a good opportunity to familiarize yourself with the commute and figure out how long it will take you to get to school. And, if your school allows you to go out for lunch, you can find interesting places to eat.