New York City Montessori Charter School

423 East 138th Street
BRONX NY 10454 Map
Phone: (347) 226-9094
Website: Click here
Admissions: District 7, lottery
Principal: Gina Sardi
Neighborhood: South Bronx
District: 7
Grade range: PK-4
Unzoned
Charter School

What's special:

New York's first public Montessori school

The downside:

Loose structure and independence may not appeal to some families

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

New York City’s first public Montessori school opened in 2011 with kindergarten and first grade and will grow to become a K-5 school with about 300 students. Hallmarks of Montessori include multi-age groupings, learning at your own pace and the use of hands-on materials.

The Montessori materials are specially designed to enable students to achieve a concrete grasp of abstract concepts. Lessons in math, for example, begin with things children can hold and touch like beads to learn how to count. Each lesson is followed by an activity that the child does by himself for practice. Over time, these activities require more and more “mental math” until the child can do problems in her head.

Yet children here do see the forest for the trees: young children are exposed to big-picture ideas like the history of writing and numbers, and the creation of the earth, via timelines, dramatic stories, pictures and words. Principal Gina Sardi describes her school as “encouraging independence, catering to a variety of learning styles, teaching concepts in a variety of ways and giving children the time they need to learn.”

Children take on an unusual amount of responsibility. They may make choices not only about where and with whom they will work, but also the order in which they will do their subjects. Each classroom is carefully arranged to help children internalize order (see photos). First, 2nd and 3rd graders (and 4th and 5th) are mixed in one classroom, and this allows children to learn from one another.

Instead of lecturing, two teachers work with small groups, pairs or singles, while the other children work on tasks according to a list of choices called a “work plan.” The adults are more like guides or coaches. Indeed, when we entered a classroom it was sometimes hard to see the teacher, who was often on the rug with students. Families looking for strict discipline, authoritarian teachers and uniforms will be disappointed.

The school has experienced some growing pains. Sardi, a longtime director of education at The Caedmon School, a private school on the Upper East Side, is working with staff to boost attendance and academic skills, and teachers grapple with how to best handle aggressive behavior like pushing and fighting. Daily gym classes allow children to let off steam and there is art twice a week. Children are tested and pulled out for extra help if they need it. However, on our visit, classes looked calm and teachers used kind, firm voices.

Public Montessori schools have unique challenges and this one is no exception. Typically children begin Montessori at age three but this school begins with kindergarten so teachers need to work harder to help the children learn the self-control and independence that teachers expect. Sardi hopes to have a pre-kindergarten in the future to address this need. Also, although all teachers are fully certified to teach elementary school, they do not yet all have the extra seven or more weeks of Montessori training, a time during which teachers learn about the philosophy and how to use the Montessori materials.

The school’s partner is the South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation (SoBRO), which provides services to families, including after-school programs and workshops on parenting, discipline, homework, or health and wellness. Efforts to bring families together include the Family Association, Family Fun Day and a Book Fair. The building is shared with the Heketi Community Charter School.

Special education: There is a slightly higher than average number of children with special needs compared to other schools in the district. Although Montessori is an individualized approach, often touted for its ability to serve children with special needs, this may not be the best choice for the child who craves structure.

Admissions: According to the school’s charter application (PDF), the school gives preference to siblings and to in-district students “in an attempt to maintain a balance of the number of children with IEPs and English language learners in each class.” Applications are due April 1. Hundreds of families are on the waiting list. (March 2013, Lydie Raschka)

InsideStats

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At a glance

Shared campus? Yes

This school shares its building with Heketi Community Charter School

Number of Students 213

Average Daily Attendance NA

Students at this school

Asian

  
1%

Black

  
34%

Hispanic

  
57%

White

  
1%

Free Lunch

  
87%

Special ed

  
17%

English Language Learners

  
12%

Safety & vibe

ARE KIDS
NICE?

How many teachers say bullying is a problem at school?

33% 17% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

62% 83% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average kindergarten class

NA 23 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average fifth grade class

NA 26 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE SCHOOL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

47% 80% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers would recommend this school to other parents?

87% 83% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Attendance

How many students are chronically absent?

NA 23% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Academics

How many teachers say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep students engaged?

73% 84% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching social-emotional skills?

80% 88% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching organizational and study skills?

87% 91% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam

8% 38% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state ela exam

4% 29% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 4th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA 83% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Parents

Are parents involved?

How many parents responded to the school survey?

59% 68% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say they attended at least one pta meeting in the last school year?

81% 72% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Does the school encourage family involvement?

How many parents say they were invited to an event at the school at least 3 times in the last school year?

84% 75% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Do parents like the school?

How many parents would recommend this school to other parents?

94% 94% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 7% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 2% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 18% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 16% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

99% 98% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with special needs are educated in the least restrictive environment appropriate?

100% 89% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents of students with ieps say this school offers a wide enough variety of services and activities for their children’s needs?

88% 89% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

Percent of ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 6% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of former ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 27% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school ensures that ells receive the same curriculum as non-ells with appropriate suppports?

50% 90% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

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