Community Roots Charter Elementary School

An Insideschools pick
An Insideschools pick for Special Education
51 SAINT EDWARDS STREET
BROOKLYN NY 11205 Map
Phone: (718) 858-1629
Website: Click here
Admissions: Lottery/District 13 priority
Principal: Allison Keil/Sara Stone
Neighborhood: Fort Greene
District: 13
Grade range: K-5
Unzoned
Charter School

What's special:

K-8, family-friendly progressive charter school that prizes diversity and inclusive environment

The downside:

Elementary and middle grades housed in two separate locations not close to the subway

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

Community Roots is a richly diverse school that offers rigorous academics in a nurturing, inclusive environment.

Unlike more traditional charter schools, at Community Roots Charter School children sprawl out on rugs during reading periods and call teachers by their first names. Teachers refer to students as "friends" and students demonstrate that they have mastered a topic with projects and presentations, rather than tests. 

Co-directors Sara Stone and Allison Keil, who founded the school in 2006, remain committed to their vision of educating children to be socially active, to treat one another kindly and to fight injustice. The school has almost equal numbers of black and white children with a smattering of Asians and Latinos—an unusual mix in a city where many schools are racially segregated. Administrators are committed to increasing the number of low-income children who attend and, as result, have set aside 40 percent of kindergarten seats for residents of three nearby public housing complexes. "Diversity is our biggest strength and our biggest challenge. We're very mission driven," said Keil. "Our work has aligned more with our mission as we have grown."

Community Roots makes a big effort to build a sense of community with families who come from diverse backgrounds and different neighborhoods. Parents who bring their children to school may stay in the classroom to read to them. A variety of workshops for parents are held in a spacious family room. There are family cooking and sports programs, that are held repeatedly, not just one-off events like a multi-cultural potluck favored by many schools.

"We're not a neighborhood school, [so] we have to make school our community," said Sahba Rohani, director of community development. "We run cooking programs until 8 at night and do heavy recruitment to get [parents] to come."

Social studies is at the core of the curriculum. Kindergartners study families and every family comes in to share their stories.

The day of our visit, a kindergartner, her older brother, and parents were in the spotlight. The father, a chef of Korean heritage, taught the class how to make kimbap—rice wrapped in dried seaweed—(and eat it). They watched a slideshow of family photos and did spin art—paint on a spinning platform—one of their classmate's favorite activities.

All classes—even science and art—have two teachers, one of whom is trained in special education. Teachers employ different strategies for children who fidget or struggle to stay still. "Let's take a walk," one teacher said to a child; another sat close to a child throughout a lesson. A late-arriving kindergartner sat at a small table eating breakfast while the rest of the class was gathered on the rug. A 5th-grader took a break to do jumping-jacks.

In a 3rd grade classroom, children were in reading groups with others of a like level and broke up into groups for math, doing different math worksheets. Some were paired with a partner. "I'm not very good at telling time," one girl told us. "She already knows so she's helping me."

Children are prompted to be nice to one another. "I want to remind you to use kind words to your partners," a teacher said. "Say it in a kinder way. Keep in mind that you have a shared purpose."

Community Roots has a school day that's longer than most. Children may arrive at 7:30 am for breakfast and classes run from 8:15 am until 3:45 pm.

Most elementary school graduates continue at Community Roots Middle School, located a five-minute walk away at 50 Navy Street in downtown Brooklyn.

SPECIAL EDUCATION: Community Roots prides itself on its inclusive environment and enrolls students with various disabilities, ranging from dyslexia to children on the autism spectrum. Every class has two teachers, at least one of whom is trained in special education.

ADMISSIONS: Lottery, priority to District 13 and siblings of current students. Forty percent of the kindergarten seats are set aside for residents of three nearby housing developments. There are far more applicants than available seats, but Community Roots maintains a waitlist and accepts students at every grade level, as openings arise. A handful of seats open up in 6th grade for middle school. (Pamela Wheaton, May 2016)

InsideStats

Click tabs above to see school stats

At a glance

Shared campus? Yes

This school shares the building with PS 67

Number of Students 300

Average Daily Attendance 96%

Students at this school

Asian

  
4%

Black

  
33%

Hispanic

  
16%

White

  
39%

Free Lunch

  
26%

Special ed

  
25%

English Language Learners

  
2%

Safety & vibe

ARE KIDS
NICE?

How many teachers say bullying is a problem at school?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

93% 81% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average kindergarten class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average fifth grade class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE SCHOOL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

89% 80% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Attendance

How many students are chronically absent?

NA 23% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Academics

How many teachers say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep students engaged?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching social-emotional skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching organizational and study skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam

44% 41% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state ela exam

50% 40% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 4th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Parents

Are parents involved?

How many parents responded to the school survey?

64% 64% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say they attended at least one pta meeting in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Does the school encourage family involvement?

How many parents say they were invited to an event at the school at least 3 times in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Do parents like the school?

How many parents would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 8% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 2% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

8% 19% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

7% 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 17% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with special needs are educated in the least restrictive environment appropriate?

98% 93% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents of students with ieps say this school offers a wide enough variety of services and activities for their children’s needs?

93% 86% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

Percent of ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

0% 6% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of former ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

0% 32% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school ensures that ells receive the same curriculum as non-ells with appropriate suppports?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

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