The Anderson School

An Insideschools pick
100 WEST 77 STREET
MANHATTAN NY 10024 Map
Phone: (212) 595-7193
Website: Click here
Admissions: Citywide
Principal: Jodi Hyde
Neighborhood: Upper West Side
District: 3
Grade range: K-8
Parent Coordinator: MARCIE SHAW
Unzoned
Gifted and Talented
Screened
Citywide

What's special:

Fast-paced academics and engaging instruction

The downside:

Daunting admission odds

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

One of the most demanding and selective schools in New York, PS 334 The Anderson School attracts children from all over the city. Engaging instruction, imaginative projects and a stellar record of getting children into top high schools (both public and private) has made Anderson one of the most sought-after schools anywhere.

Don’t set your heart on sending your child here, however. The competition for admission is unbelievably tough. Nearly 15,000 4-year-olds take the city’s “gifted and talented” test each year; of those, 1,500 score high enough to qualify for Anderson and four other citywide gifted programs. Just 50 are admitted to Anderson’s kindergarten and a handful in 1st through 3rd grades. The odds are ever so slightly better in the middle school, particularly in 7th grade (when one-third of the class leaves for Hunter College High School, which begins in 7th grade.)

The school has a particularly strong math program. Rather than relying on one set of textbooks, teachers skillfully blend different approaches that combine fast-paced instruction with deep conceptual understanding. Teachers encourage children to look for different ways to solve problems and the kids seem to take joy in discovery—not just in getting the right answer. By 8th grade, nearly all have passed the high school algebra Regents exam.

While kindergarten classrooms elsewhere have removed blocks and dramatic play areas, at Anderson children enjoy “center time” when they may shop at a play store (and learn to make change), squeeze and flatten bits of clay (strengthening fine motor skills) or roll marbles down ramps made from wooden blocks. On our visit, we saw a kindergartner put together “base ten blocks” usually used by older children to learn addition, subtraction and place value. As the boy used the blocks to construct a house, the teacher encouraged him to count them—what turned into a three-digit addition problem.

Most children have reading skills that are well above grade level, with 1st-graders often reading books more typical for 3rd-graders. (See the school website for recommended summer reading.) Third-graders’ essays about where they spent their summer vacation reflect both sophistication and the good luck of being world travelers at a young age, with stories about a trip to China; a country house in Woodstock; Cancun, Mexico, and Disneyland in France. Fourth-graders’ essays showed an understanding of complex ideas, such as a report one child wrote about the air quality in New York nail salons.

A beloved science teacher, Charles Conway, asked 5th-graders to determine how changing the length of a pendulum affects the number of swings in a given time period. Sixth-graders use a rooftop weather station to predict the weather. Eighth-graders take the high school Regent exam for living environment, as biology is called.

In an 8th-grade U.S. history class, we heard a lively discussion comparing the debate over the Fugitive Slave Act to today’s gridlock in Congress. In an 8th-grade English class, children were asked to write a “coming-of-age memoir—a moment when your perspective on the world changed and you grew up a little,” using as models writing by authors such as Jeanette Walls, Ernest Hemingway and David Sedaris.

The homework load is heavy but not oppressive. Kindergartners have weekly homework packets. By middle school, children may spend two hours a night on homework. Kids compete in the math team or the Science Olympiad, but aren’t cut-throat, says Principal Jodi Hyde. “They say, ‘Yes, we’re competitive because we want to do well.’ But they aren’t mean to each other. They are competitive with themselves.” 

The school is committed to giving extra academic and emotional support to all. Despite this help, a handful of children can’t keep up with the work and perhaps one a year leaves the school as a result. Graduates go on to the top high schools in the city, including elite public schools like Stuyvesant and Bronx High School of Science and private schools like Trinity.  

The school has a very active PTA that raises more than $1 million a year for assistant teachers in every class as well as programs such as dance, chess, sports and field trips. The PTA has a “suggested contribution” of $1,300 per child. Some are put off by the Type A crowd, but many appreciate such intense participation.

SPECIAL EDUCATION: The school offers speech and occupational therapy. A handful of children who have disabilities such as dyslexia receive extra help. A guidance counselor works on social skills with children with conditions like Asperger’s syndrome.

ADMISSIONS: Officially, students must score in the 97th percentile on the G&T tests to qualify for Anderson and other citywide G&T schools, but Anderson rarely admits children who score below the 99th percentile (except for younger siblings of Anderson students who qualify with a 97). Yellow bus service is available for Manhattan students who live more than half a mile from school. Students outside Manhattan arrange their own transportation. (Clara Hemphill, October 2015)

InsideStats

Click tabs above to see school stats

At a glance

Shared campus? Yes

This school shares a building with the Computer School and PS 452

Number of Students 559

Average Daily Attendance 98%

Students at this school

Asian

  
28%

Black

  
4%

Hispanic

  
9%

White

  
53%

Free Lunch

  
10%

Special ed

  
3%

English Language Learners

  
0%

Safety & vibe

ARE KIDS
NICE?

How many teachers say bullying is a problem at school?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

93% 75% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average kindergarten class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average fifth grade class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average middle school english class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE SCHOOL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

100% 79% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Attendance

How many students are chronically absent?

1% 22% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Academics

How many teachers say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep students engaged?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching social-emotional skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching organizational and study skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of students in grades 3-8 who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam

97% 40% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of students in grades 3-8 who scored 3 or 4 on the state ela exam

95% 41% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 4th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 8th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many 8th grades pass high school regents exams?

Percent of 8th graders who take and pass the algebra regents:

100% 14% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 8th graders who take and pass a science regents:

100% 17% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Parents

Are parents involved?

How many parents responded to the school survey?

86% 59% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say they attended at least one pta meeting in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Does the school encourage family involvement?

How many parents say they were invited to an event at the school at least 3 times in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Do parents like the school?

How many parents would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 6% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 2% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 14% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 8% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 15% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with special needs are educated in the least restrictive environment appropriate?

96% 91% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents of students with ieps say this school offers a wide enough variety of services and activities for their children’s needs?

92% 84% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

Percent of ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

0% 3% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of former ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 19% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school ensures that ells receive the same curriculum as non-ells with appropriate suppports?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

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