PS 126 Jacob August Riis/Manhattan Academy of Technology

An Insideschools pick
80 CATHERINE STREET
MANHATTAN NY 10038 Map
Phone: (212) 962-2188
Website: Click here
Admissions: Neighborhood school/selective MS program
Principal: Jacqueline Getz
Neighborhood: Two Bridges
District: 2
Grade range: PK-8
Parent Coordinator: REBECCA JOHNSON
Number of full-day PK seats: 54
Extended PK hours offered: Please contact site for more information
Zoned
Full Day
School-based pre-k

What's special:

Strong academics and a wide array of sports

The downside:

PTA isn't as well-funded as some other District 2 schools

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

A sweet, engaging place, PS 126/Manhattan Academy of Technology (MAT) is a combined elementary and middle school with strong academics, an impressive sports program and a dynamic community spirit.

The elementary school serves neighborhood children from Chinatown and the Lower East Side, representing a range of races and ethnicities—including children from nearby housing projects and those from a homeless shelter that's just on the other side of the school's playground. It does a wonderful job teaching English to kids who speak Spanish or Chinese at home and works with two language consultants from CUNY. Kids were happy and well-behaved in every class we visited.

PS 126 is a place where teachers can perfect their craft, and in doing so they offer children of different backgrounds thoughtful, rigorous, progressive education. The level of teacher collaboration and planning is impressive. Reading, writing and science come together in an investigation of birds in 2nd grade, for example, and 5th-graders spend two months studying prairie ecosystems to support their Westward Expansion unit. The school uses Math in Focus, a Singapore-based math program, and a math consultant works with teachers, who also visit each other during math lessons to offer feedback.

The middle school, called MAT, is open to children from across District 2 and middle class parents from neighborhoods like Tribeca clamor for admission. Teachers’ excitement for their students progress is palpable and they do a good job giving extra help to the children who need it while offering a challenge to the top students, even though students aren’t grouped by ability. For example, a strong reader may be assigned a complex book about World War II, while a struggling reader may be assigned an easy one—but all can take part in the same class discussion. Eighth-graders may take the algebra and Earth science Regents exams. Most classes have two teachers. Teachers may work with a small group of students, or even one-on-one.

In a middle school history class, teachers and students brought the Jazz Age to life by creating their very own speakeasy with costumes, readings from Langston Hughes and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and even a “bar” serving root beer. Students are encouraged to engage in the city around them, starting the year off with a study of their own neighborhood’s gentrification. After studying the history of nearby Catherine Street (the area was first a boat slip and then a popular public market), students petitioned local officials and worked with the Parks Department to have plaques installed in spring of 2016. Kids have even started their own website, LESyounghistorians.com.

PS 126 prizes the arts and has two art teachers and two music teachers that serve all grades. The music program is very strong and kids seemed to clearly enjoy the change of pace. On the day of our visit, we saw a music student from NYU leading 8th-graders in a lively warm up, using their own bodies as percussion instruments to work on rhythm and beat. In 6th grade, children choose to “major” either in visual art or band.

The physical education teacher, John DeMatteo, has assembled 51 teams in 27 sports to create the largest middle school sports program in the country—including exotic sports like surfing and more traditional ones like soccer and basketball. The fitness room has exercise bikes attached to video games—making exercise fun even for kids who might otherwise prefer to be couch potatoes. Students are not cut from teams; instead, there is a range of levels for each sport and most middle schoolers participate. (DeMatteo also helped create the city’s CHAMPS Middle School Sport and Fitness League and continues to oversee its management.)

The building, constructed in the 1970s, has wide, shiny corridors, clean white walls and doors trimmed in yellow, red, blue, lavender, green and purple. Large windows let in plenty of sunlight, and there are views of the Brooklyn Bridge just a few blocks away. A climbing wall (with fake rocks) on the back of the stage in the auditorium gives kids a fun way to build strength.

One possible downside: The PTA isn’t as rich as at most District 2 schools, and cannot raise as much money for extras. Still, that hasn’t stopped administration and teachers from securing an impressive array of programs and specialized equipment through grants and personal appeals to donors. In addition to “a gazillion field trips,” extras include chess and swimming.

A large proportion of graduates attend specialized high schools, including LaGuardia, and District 2 schools, such as Eleanor Roosevelt and Millennium. Beacon High School is also popular.

In fall 2016, Carlos Romero is set to head PS 126/MAT after having served as assistant principal of the middle school since 2004. He replaces seasoned administrator Jacqueline Getz, who called Romero's promotion "well-deserved." Getz announced she will spend the year planning a new District 2 Middle School on Morton Street opening in 2017.

SPECIAL EDUCATION: The school has long served children with a range of special education needs. The school offers ICT (integrated co-teaching) classes with two teachers, one of whom is certified in special education.

ADMISSIONS: Zoned elementary school. Fifth-graders from PS 126 get first priority to the middle school, but students from anywhere in District 2 may apply. (Clara Hemphill, October 2012 & Aimee Sabo, June 2016)

InsideStats

Click tabs above to see school stats

At a glance

Shared campus? No

This school is in its own building.

Number of Students 759

Average Daily Attendance 97%

Students at this school

Asian

  
59%

Black

  
11%

Hispanic

  
21%

White

  
8%

Free Lunch

  
80%

Special ed

  
17%

English Language Learners

  
17%

Safety & vibe

ARE KIDS
NICE?

How many teachers say bullying is a problem at school?

21% 22% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

94% 84% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average kindergarten class

19 22 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average fifth grade class

26 26 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average middle school english class

28 26 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE SCHOOL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

98% 85% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers would recommend this school to other parents?

96% 86% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Attendance

How many students are chronically absent?

10% 21% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Academics

How many teachers say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep students engaged?

98% 78% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching social-emotional skills?

96% 84% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching organizational and study skills?

88% 87% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of students in grades 3-8 who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam

64% 38% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of students in grades 3-8 who scored 3 or 4 on the state ela exam

52% 31% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 4th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

67% 82% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 8th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA 57% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many 8th grades pass high school regents exams?

Percent of 8th graders who take and pass the algebra regents:

74% 13% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 8th graders who take and pass a science regents:

76% 17% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Parents

Are parents involved?

How many parents responded to the school survey?

37% 57% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say they attended at least one pta meeting in the last school year?

72% 69% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Does the school encourage family involvement?

How many parents say they were invited to an event at the school at least 3 times in the last school year?

50% 71% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Do parents like the school?

How many parents would recommend this school to other parents?

99% 93% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

0% 5% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

0% 2% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

15% 14% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

15% 8% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

30% 15% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

17% 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

98% 97% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with special needs are educated in the least restrictive environment appropriate?

98% 93% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents of students with ieps say this school offers a wide enough variety of services and activities for their children’s needs?

92% 88% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

Percent of ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

18% 4% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of former ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

48% 21% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school ensures that ells receive the same curriculum as non-ells with appropriate suppports?

95% 88% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

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