Port Richmond High School

Grades 9-12

What’s Special

Beautiful athletic fields

The Downside

Low graduation rate

Our Review

Port Richmond is a large, traditional high school located in an old, residential neighborhood on Staten Island's north shore. With the towering arch of the Bayonne Bridge as its back drop, the school is housed in a well-maintained building that was constructed in 1920 and expanded in 1993 with the addition of a new wing. "We're a hidden gem," said Principal Tim Gannon in reference to the fact that many from Staten Island's newer communities (post-dating the opening of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge) along the south shore and at mid-island overlook the school because of its location.

The student population at Port Richmond is very diverse with no one ethnic group or range of student performance defining its community. It has a lot of highly motivated students recruited through its three, selective programs as well as its share who struggle academically, many of whom arrive their freshman year performing below grade level. There is an infant daycare center on the premises for the benefit of student parents and a program for low performing, older students designed to deliver instruction of core subjects in a single classroom environment. Teachers travel to the students, which minimizes the distraction of period changes as well as the opportunity to cut class.

Open to all students are programs in culinary arts, medical technology, information technology (focusing on Microsoft applications) and a television production studio. The latter is an elective available to seniors who fulfill all their English requirements. There is also a very active Junior ROTC program. Several members that we spoke with, all of whom were donning the ROTC uniforms, said that the program keeps them motivated and makes them feel apart of a group. As of 2016 the school also offers a Spanish-English dual language program.

Participants in the Virtual Enterprise, the school's business management program, spend their senior year running one of two virtual businesses. Their headquarters is a large room designed to replicate a corporate environment complete with cubicles and standard office equipment and furniture. Students must perform all tasks related to running a business from drafting a business plan, marketing and advertising to the administration of benefits, filing of tax returns and payment of salaries with funds drawn from mock bank accounts.

Of the three "screened" or selective programs, two require strong academics for admission. The Gateway Institute for Pre-College Education recruits minority student interested in science and medical-related careers. In one Gateway biology class students were relaxed and engaged, most raising their hands when asked what they knew about energy recycling. "You can't recycle energy," offered one girl. "You're right, it was trick question," responded the teacher. The Collegiate Academy Honors Program offers rigorous instruction in humanities, math and science for high achievers of all backgrounds. The College Discovery Program targets the more average student, offering a mix of honors-paced and regular courses. The school also offers advanced placement classes in several subjects, some open to students as early as their freshman year.

In non-honors classes we saw a big range in performance. For example in a collaborative team taught social studies course (two teachers with a mixture of general and special education students), the teacher was effective in drawing students into a discussion on the role that congressional committees play in the confirmation of presidential appointees. While some were knowledgeable about recent events in Congress, others struggled with the basic concept of a committee, unable to offer a definition or any examples.

All students that we met said they felt safe in the school and that there were no ethnic or racial tensions, a sentiment echoed by Gannon who noted that "many of the students come from diverse neighborhoods, so the school is no different for them." Those who were in one of the selective programs said it was important for them to maintain good grades. "I feel better in the better classes," said one student." "If you're in the other classes, some kids can be disruptive." Some of the long-term goals expressed by students were becoming an architect, fashion designer, child psychologist, police officer, archeologist and earning a masters degree in Europe.

The school is overcrowded and has to rely on portable classrooms and double sessions to handle the scheduling of its 2,700 students. In recent years the facilities have benefited from upgrades, including new athletic fields, a lot of new technology throughout the school, a fitness center with commercial grade weight training and cardio equipment and a spinning room with 30 new bicycles on par with those found in expensive health clubs.

Special education: The school has "collaborative team taught" (CTT) classes, where two teachers work with a group of special- and general education students.

College admissions: According to the College Office, 78 percent of graduates attend college. Many attend CUNY and SUNY schools, but some attend private colleges including Ivy League schools and other elite universities. (Laura Zingmond, November, 2005; updated July 2016)

About the students

Enrollment
1583
Asian
6.7%
Black
24.4%
Hispanic
44.8%
White
22.6%
Other
1.5%
Free or reduced priced lunch
66%
Students with disabilities
26%
English language learners
7%
Male
52%

About the school

Shared campus?
No
This school is in its own building.
Uniforms required?
No
Metal detectors?
No
How crowded? (Full is 100%)
82%
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

Attendance

Average daily attendance
86%
85% Citywide Average
How many students are chronically absent?
35%
42% Citywide Average

Is this school safe?

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained at this school?
93%
76% Citywide Average
How many students think bullying happens most or all of the time at this school?
19%
18% Citywide Average
How many students say they feel safe in the hallways, bathrooms and locker rooms?
84%
84% Citywide Average
How many students say most students treat each other with respect?
46%
56% Citywide Average

About the leadership

Years of principal experience at this school
11.4
5.3 Citywide Average
How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?
91%
77% Citywide Average
How many teachers say the principal has a clear vision for this school?
91%
83% Citywide Average
How many teachers trust the principal?
86%
78% Citywide Average

About the teachers

How many teachers have 3 or more years of experience teaching?
85%
73% Citywide Average
Teacher attendance
97%
97% Citywide Average
How many teachers say they would recommend this school to other families?
95%
79% Citywide Average
How many teachers think the staff collaborate to make this school run effectively?
89%
84% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

Arts offerings

This school has 4 dedicated spaces for Music, an Auditorium, and a Film Studio
This school has 3 licensed arts teachers in Theater and Visual arts

Engaging curriculum?

How many students say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep them interested?
84%
71% Citywide Average
How many students say they are challenged in most or all of their classes?
55%
49% Citywide Average
How many students say the programs, classes and activities here encourage them to develop talent outside academics?
83%
70% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

How many graduate?

How many students graduate in 4 years?
59%
77% Citywide Average
How many graduates earn Advanced Regents diplomas?
7%
11% Citywide Average
How many students drop out?
16%
10% Citywide Average

Are students prepared for college?

How many students graduate with test scores high enough to enroll at CUNY without remedial help?
22%
32% Citywide Average
How many students take a college-level course or earn a professional certificate?
38%
41% Citywide Average
How many graduate and enter college within 18 months?
53%
63% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

How does this school serve English Language Learners?

How many former English language learners score 3-4 on the State ELA exam?
0%
0% Citywide Average
How many English language learners graduate in 4 years?
29%
65% Citywide Average

How does this school serve students with disabilities?

This school offers self-contained classes
This school offers team teaching (ICT)
How many students say that students with disabilities are included in all activities?
80%
64% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say this school offers enough activities and services for their children's needs?
86%
87% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say this school works to achive the goals of their students' IEPs?
91%
90% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say they are satisfied with the IEP development process at this school?
92%
89% Citywide Average
How many special ed students graduate in 4 years?
50%
60% Citywide Average
For more information about our data sources, see About Our Data

Programs and Admissions

The Gateway Scholars Program
Admissions Method: Screened
Program Description

A competitive honors program that prepares students for college study in applied mathematics, sciences, and related professions. Students complete college-level courses in science and research opportunities, internships, and SAT/ACT prep.

Culinary Arts
Admissions Method: Ed. Opt.
Program Description

Prepares students for career opportunities in the catering and food services industry.

Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps
Admissions Method: Ed. Opt.
Program Description

Provides students with the tools, training, and experiences required for today’s leadership roles. Drill courses provide the opportunity for students to participate in the National Drill Competition.

Institute of Business Technology, Hospitality & Entrepreneurship
Admissions Method: Ed. Opt.
Program Description

A challenging program that immerses students in a CTE instructional model preparing them for business, economics, finance, and career education through the Virtual Enterprise Program and the Hospitality and Tourism Program.

The Academy of Television, Visual and Performing Arts
Admissions Method: Ed. Opt.
Program Description

Students study various forms of the arts including television, film, radio, journalism, band, orchestra, guitar, chorus, drawing, and painting. Students are prepared for college majors and careers in all areas of the television, visual, and performing arts through a strong academic foundation and hands-on experience.

Medical Technology
Admissions Method: Ed. Opt.
Program Description

Medical Technology introduces students to the multitude of occupations and careers available in the medical and health professions; the hands-on program prepares students for college-level courses through lab experience and internships.

Collegiate Academy Honors Program
Admissions Method: Screened
Program Description

A challenging four-year honors program designed for students with outstanding academic ability; this program provides multiple opportunities for college-level courses, AP courses, and inquiry-based learning.

Zoned
Admissions Method: Zoned Guarantee
Program Description

Academic Comprehensive Program

Academics

Language Courses

Italian, Spanish

Advanced Placement (AP) courses

AP Biology, AP Calculus, AP English, AP Environmental Science, AP Psychology, AP Statistics, AP US Government and Politics, AP World History

Sports

Boys PSAL teams

Baseball, Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Football, Handball, Indoor Track, Lacrosse, Outdoor Track, Soccer, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball, Wrestling

Girls PSAL teams

Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Flag Football, Gymnastics, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball

Coed PSAL teams

Golf, Stunt

Read about admissions, academics, and more at this school on the NYCDOE’s School Finder
NYC Department of Education: School Finder

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