Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation

Grades 9-12

Location

410 East 100 Street
Manhattan NY 10029
East Harlem (District 4)
Trains: 6 to 103rd St; Q to 96th St
Buses: M15, M15-SBS, M96, M101, M102, M103

Contact

Phone
212-722-5871
Principal
Terence Joseph
Parent Coordinator

What’s Special

Hands-on learning and field trips

The Downside

The progressive approach may not be for everyone

Our Review

Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation is an unapologetically progressive high school run by an idealistic young educator who seeks to instill pride and competence in urban teens.

At some charter schools kids spend the greater part of the day their seats, in uniforms, and silent in the halls. At Innovation there there are no bells, no uniforms and no hallway passes. Teachers helps teens develop year-long projects they are passionate about and take them out and about in the city, exposing them to art, history, politics and ecology.

It is modeled after the popular K-12 Renaissance Charter School in Queens, which values experimentation and "learning by doing." Daily college preparation classes are also a feature of Renaissance schools. In their classes, students may learn about chemistry using Legos or create an educational video. In 2013 Renaissance Innovation won a grant to participate in a software engineering pilot program.

The school opened in 2010 in a building occupied by Manhattan East and the lower grades of Success Academy Harlem 3. The day is from 9 am to 4 pm, but students are invited to stay until 6 pm to receive homework help in the Writing Center. Teachers keep track of student progress, attendance and homework with an online tracking system.

Classes are suspended twice a year for week-long enrichment projects and field trips based on themes like fashion, democracy, urban ecology or journalism. A group called "learning English through social justice" volunteers in a soup kitchen; an engineering group creates Rube Goldberg-like machines and soda-powered rockets.

[In January 2014, school founders Nicholas Tishuk and his wife Rita left the school. In a Jan. 7, 2014 letter sent to friends and staff, they cited undisclosed actions by the school's board of trustees.] Mr. Tishuk was only 31 years old when the couple opened this rare stand-alone charter high school in a poorer part of the city, admitting kids with skills as low as 4th or 5th grade level. They recruited and embraced students with a high level of need: over 30 percent are of the students have special needs compared with 11 percent citywide. These students are mixed into general education classes with at least two teachers.

Tishuk identifies with his East Harlem students because he grew up poor, in Florida, the child of a single mother who was a waitress, according to an article in DNAinfo. He held various roles for six years at the original Renaissance Charter School and prior to that he was 11th grade English teacher at a high school in Bedford-Stuyvesant.

Feedback from the Innovations community is mixed: parents feel welcome and most students feel challenged and engaged, but some teachers would like more feedback and better management from the administration.

After school offerings include recording arts, poetry club, basketball, and visionaries collective, an art and design class.

Admissions: Lottery with priority to District 4 families. Application must be received by April 1. (Lydie Raschka, web reports, November 2013)

About the students

Enrollment
470
Asian
0.6%
Black
38.3%
Hispanic
59.2%
White
1.1%
Other
0.9%
Free or reduced priced lunch
76%
Students with disabilities
37%
English language learners
12%
Male
55%

About the school

Shared campus?
Yes
This school shares the building with MS 224 and Success Academy Harlem 3 Charter
Metal detectors?
No
How crowded? (Full is 100%)
88%
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

Attendance

Average daily attendance
87%
85% Citywide Average
How many students are chronically absent?
35%
42% Citywide Average

Is this school safe?

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained at this school?
59%
77% Citywide Average
How many students think bullying happens most or all of the time at this school?
52%
37% Citywide Average
How many students say they feel safe in the hallways, bathrooms and locker rooms?
86%
85% Citywide Average
How many students say most students treat each other with respect?
39%
57% Citywide Average

About the leadership

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?
79%
80% Citywide Average
How many teachers say the principal has a clear vision for this school?
84%
85% Citywide Average
How many teachers trust the principal?
75%
80% Citywide Average

About the teachers

How many teachers say they would recommend this school to other families?
74%
81% Citywide Average
How many teachers think the staff collaborate to make this school run effectively?
85%
86% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

Engaging curriculum?

How many students say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep them interested?
81%
72% Citywide Average
How many students say they are challenged in most or all of their classes?
47%
54% Citywide Average
How many students say the programs, classes and activities here encourage them to develop talent outside academics?
80%
71% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

How many graduate?

How many students graduate in 4 years?
56%
77% Citywide Average

Are students prepared for college?

How many students graduate with test scores high enough to enroll at CUNY without remedial help?
1%
32% Citywide Average
How many students take a college-level course or earn a professional certificate?
15%
41% Citywide Average
How many graduate and enter college within 18 months?
46%
63% Citywide Average
Citywide Average Key
This school is Better Near Worse than the citywide average

How does this school serve English Language Learners?

How many English language learners graduate in 4 years?
47%
65% Citywide Average

How does this school serve students with disabilities?

How many students say that students with disabilities are included in all activities?
82%
68% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say this school offers enough activities and services for their children's needs?
89%
87% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say this school works to achive the goals of their students' IEPs?
92%
91% Citywide Average
How many parents of students with disabilities say they are satisfied with the IEP development process at this school?
88%
90% Citywide Average
How many special ed students graduate in 4 years?
45%
60% Citywide Average
For more information about our data sources, see About Our Data
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