John Bowne High School

An Insideschools pick
63-25 MAIN STREET
QUEENS NY 11367 Map
Phone: (718) 263-1919
Website: Click here
Admissions: neighborhood/ ed opt
Principal: Howard Kwait
Neighborhood: Flushing/ College Pt.
District: 25
Grade range: 9-12
Parent Coordinator: Ivan Castillo
Humanities & Interdisciplinary
Science & Math
Zoned
Animal Science
Wheelchair Accessible
Vocational

Buses: Q17, Q20A, Q20B, Q25, Q88

What's special:

Topnotch agricultural, science and writing programs; kids learn to farm

The downside:

Overcrowding; gigantic school on quadruple sessions

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

John Bowne is a large comprehensive high school best known for its agriculture program. Located on Main Street in Flushing, Bowne serves a diverse student body: nearly 1,000 students are English Language Learners, representing 80 different countries, and 325 receive special education services.

"We have some of the best and brightest and we have some of the most challenging students," Principal Howard Kwait said.

Bowne feels almost like a small city. There is a 3.8-acre working farm, a greenhouse, a barn, a henhouse and assorted animals. A championship baseball team plays on its own diamond and there are several gymnasiums for the 26 sports teams. The overcrowded school has classes in four overlapping sessions from 7:25 a.m. to 4:37 p.m. A dozen trailers in the school yard serve the overflow of students from the sprawling main building, which is clean but somewhat worn, with torn window shades and peeling paint. Hallways are crowded, but not packed. Instead of jarring bells when classes change, music plays – sometimes opera, sometimes pop, a custom Kwait brought to the school from nearby Townsend Harris, where he was assistant principal of organization before coming to Bowne in 2006.

Many staff members are Bowne graduates, including Steve Perry, longtime director of the agriculture program. Aggies (as the agricultural students are known), openly gay students and ROTC cadets seem to coexist peacefully and teens told us they support one another. AIDS ribbons and tee shirts were for sale on our visit, poinsettias were blooming in the greenhouse, and drama students were rehearsing a play in the auditorium. Spanish, Chinese, French, Italian, and Latin are offered. On the day of our visit, students in a portable classroom were acting out a story in Latin using singular and plural verbs.

The agricultural program, a four-year concentration of study in plant and animal sciences, is a marvel. Bowne must be one of the few city schools to have members of Future Farmers of America. Aggie's cultivate crops and sell their harvest in a school store and summer-road side stand. They care for an amazing array of animals: iguanas, snakes, fish, llamas, alpacas, miniature horses, goats and hens which lay dozens of eggs daily. An entire room is devoted to more than 70 birds. Visitors are likely to be greeted by a parrot calling out "Hello". A lab is lined with cages of small rodents, colorful snakes and fish, including tilapia which the students eat at a year-end party. Entrance to the agriculture program is not selective but students who apply should be sure they like animals and farm work. The summer before 9th grade, incoming students are assigned a "land lab" and are given a 15 x 15-foot plot to grow crops. Older students may live and work on farms upstate.

Students in the writing program get an extra English or writing class every term, produce sophisticated school plays and poetry slams. The cast of "Chinglish," a Broadway show came to see the school's 2011 production of "Dog Sees God."

In the selective science program, students may work on research projects and take advanced courses, including high-level calculus. The school's zoned students are in the Bowne House–and the principal is quick to note that some of them score higher on their SATs than the science whizzes. ROTC is a draw for a few hundred Bowne House students who learn discipline from their cadet mentors.

Native Spanish and Chinese speakers may choose to be in bilingual programs or in English as a Second Language. We saw a group of ESL students in a history class, looking at pictures of slaves and writing descriptions. Slavery was a concept new to some, and they had trouble picking out which were the slaves and which were the masters. Using a computer program, they looked up unfamiliar words like "merchant."

School safety has improved in recent years, and the number of suspensions has declined. We didn't see many hallway stragglers although five students were sitting in the "principal's learning center" for those who act out. Students and teachers say they feel safe. Still, 43 percent of teachers said there are problems with order and discipline, according to the Learning Environment Survey. The school has six safety agents, and administrators say that's not enough to cover the building's multiple exits.

There is some friction between the administration and staff: Teachers give Kwait low marks for communication and say he doesn't include them often enough in decision-making, according to the Learning Environment Survey. Kwait says he has "swapped out" about 100 teachers and a few assistant principals since he became principal and not everyone likes change.

Special education: Nearly one-quarter of the students are categorized as special needs. There are 58 self-contained classes.

College admissions: There is only one college counselor in the busy college office. Between 60 and 70 percent of the graduates go to two or four year colleges, mostly CUNYs and SUNYs. A few students have received Posse scholarships for the University of Wisconsin. Aggies seek out top agricultural programs such as those at Cornell or Rutgers.

Admissions: Zoned students are eligible for Bowne House; the agricultural and writing programs accept a range of high and low-achieving students. The honors science program accepts kids with an average of 85 or higher and 3s or 4s on standardized tests. (Pamela Wheaton, December 2011)

InsideStats

Click tabs above to see school stats

At a glance

Shared campus? No

This school is in its own building

Number of Students 3722

Average Daily Attendance 83%

Uniforms? No

Metal detectors? No

Students at this school

Asian

  
31%

Black

  
19%

Hispanic

  
44%

White

  
5%

Free Lunch

  
71%

Special ed

  
12%

English Language Learners

  
24%

INCOMING STUDENTS' PROFICIENCY: 2.44 2.40 CITYWIDE AVERAGE


1 = Far below grade level 2 = Below grade level 3 = At grade level 4 = Above grade level

Safety & vibe

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average english class

29 25 CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO STUDENTS LIKE THE TEACHERS?

How many students say their teachers inspire them to learn?

57% 63% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE PRINCIPAL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

86% 78% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

IS THIS SCHOOL SAFE?

How many students say they feel safe in hallways, bathrooms and locker rooms?

75% 82% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

 
 

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

80% 77% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

HOW IS
ATTENDANCE?

How Many Students are Chronically Absent?

38% 38% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Who graduates

Class of 2014

How many students graduated within 4 years?

66% 73% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many students graduated within 6 years?

73% 80% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Previous Years

How many students graduated within 4 years?

66% 65% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many graduates earned an advanced regents diploma within 4 years?

15% 11% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many students graduated within 6 years?

73% 75% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many graduates dropped out within 4 years?

11% 10% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

College prep

Does this school offer a college preparatory curriculum?

How many students took an AP or IB class and scored at least a "3" on the AP exam or a "4" on the IB exam?

16%

How Many Students took a College Course and Got a "C" or Higher?

19%

How many students passed a Regents exam for algebra 2, physics or chemistry?

30%

Are students ready for college?

How many students graduated in four years with test scores high enough to enroll at CUNY without remedial help?

32% 27% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

SAT reading scores

418
418 CITYWIDE AVERAGE 497 NATIONWIDE AVERAGE

How many students graduated in four years and enrolled in college?

55% 63% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

SAT math scores

460
426 CITYWIDE AVERAGE 513 NATIONWIDE AVERAGE

Is the guidance counseling helpful?

How many students say that this school provides helpful counseling on college or job-seeking?

67% 76% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

How many special ed students graduated within 4 years?

53% 47% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many special ed students graduated within 6 years?

43% 54% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many students with disabilities spend most of the day with non-disabled peers?

67% 68% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

96% 89% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

How many English language learners graduated within 4 years?

37% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many English language learners graduated within 6 years?

56% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Programs and Admissions

School admission priorities:

  1. Open to New York City residents
  2. For Zoned Program only: priority to students who live in the zoned area

Source: High school directory

Academy for Creative Artists

Ed. Opt.

Academy for Creative Artists (A.C.A.) is a vibrant community of young creative artists and their teachers. A.C.A. offers talented writers and actors opportunities to explore their gifts through creative and academic writing courses, workshops, literary experiences, drama and performance.

Introduction to Agriculture

Ed. Opt.

for the required summer session

Science Technology Engineering and Math (S.T.E.M.) Research Program

Screened

4-year Honors S.T.E.M. Academy with hands-on competitive scientific research program; college and career preparation in math, science, medicine, technology; internships in medical facilities, colleges/universities; scholarships.

Selection Criteria

  • English (85-100) , Math (85-100) , Science (85-100) , Social Studies (85-100)
  • Math Levels: Levels 3-4 ; English Language Arts Levels: Levels 3-4

There may be additional selection criteria, see the High School Directory for more information

Zoned

Zoned

Academic Comprehensive Program

Academics

AP COURSES: Biology, Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Chemistry, Chinese Language and Culture, Computer Science A, English Literature and Composition, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, Spanish Language and Culture, Statistics, United States Government and Politics, United States History

Source: High school directory

Sports/Clubs

EXTRACURRICULAR: African Club, Agriculture Publication, Agriculture Sales Team, Anti-Bullying Alliance, Arista, Blood Drive, Cheerleading, Chemistry Olympiad, Chinese, College Visitations, Conflict Resolution, Dance Team, Debate Team, Desi Club, Drama, Envirothon Team, Equine Team, Euro Challenge, Fashion, Floriculture, Foreign Language, Freshman Year Initiative, Future Farmers of America (FFA), Glee, Green Team, Holiday Celebrations, In-House Plant Science, Indo-Pak, Intex, Japanese, Journalism, Junior Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps Drill Team, Key Club, Leadership Program, Literary Magazines, Livestock Judging Team, Mock Trial, Moot Court, Muslim Students Association, Peer Mediation, Robotics, Civil Engineering, School Dance, School Newspaper, Science Olympiad, Small Animal Care, Student Ambassador, Student Animal Science/Plant Science Competitions, Student Union, Talent Show, Winter Carnival, Wrestling, Yearbook

BOYS PSAL SPORTS: Baseball & JV Baseball, Basketball & JV Basketball, Bowling, Cricket, Cross Country, Golf, Handball, Outdoor Track, Soccer, Tennis, Volleyball, Wrestling

GIRLS PSAL SPORTS: Basketball, Handball, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track, Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Volleyball & JV Volleyball

Other schools sports: Equestrian Team

Source: High school directory

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